The Crucible Non Fiction

1142 Words 5 Pages
Crucible and Non-Fiction Essay Similarities History, regardless of the time period, is often manufactured by the winners in order to appease them. From the ancient Greek warrior Alexander the Great’s controversial title, to the Unites States expansion, which treated the Native American tribes atrociously, the dominating force has always been able to overwrite their flaws. This can lead to a multitude of facades, and truth in its entirety is often lost in the process. However, fictional literature helps to bring an air of truth to the subject, when compared to historical works of the same era. This case is shown in both the 1690’s during the Salem Witch Trials, as well as in the 1940s-50s, during the historical era known as the Red Scare. While …show more content…
For instance, Parris is not well liked throughout Salem community. This is largely due to his materialistic views, which contrast the spiritual desires of the Puritans. Upon Parris’s arrival in Salem, he “preach nothin’ but golden candlesticks until he had them”, angering many citizens of Salem, as they saw nothing wrong with their pewter candles (The Crucible, 65). Discrepancies such as these drove a wedge between Parris and the community, so that when Abigail was found dancing in the woods, Parris felt obligated to blame it on witchcraft, rather than take the censure himself. Had he been held responsible, he believes it would have “compromised his very character”, and caused even more anger towards him (The Crucible, 11). Moreover, Elizabeth Proctor, protagonist John Proctor’s wife, has views about witches which differ from the rest of Salem village. Since the Bible speaks of witches, their theocracy essentially mandates that they believe in witches. Conversely, Elizabeth believes that “If you [Hale] think that I am one [a witch], then I say there are none” (The Crucible, 70). This differing opinion, rather than merely being brushed off, led to a barrage of questions from Hale, who consequently saw her as a potential witch. In a prompt change of events, Hale’s intolerance of Elizabeth’s opinion helped turn a benign questioning into an …show more content…
Throughout the second half of Miller’s drama, protagonist John Proctor goes to great measures to preserve his good name. In the closing act, Danforth gives Proctor the choice between signing a deposition stating he is guilty of witchcraft, or being hanged. Choosing not to sign the affidavit because “It is my [Proctor’s] name! Because I cannot have another in my life!”, he maintains his good name at the definitive price of his life (The Crucible, 143). However, John Proctor is not the only individual concerned for his own reputation, for his wife Elizabeth goes to great lengths in order to protect both John and herself. Before Elizabeth enters court, Proctor insists that Elizabeth has never told a lie and is a virtuous Puritan woman. Conversely, when Danforth questions her about John’s affair with Abigail, she denies all accusations as to ensure Proctor keeps his high-standing position in the community, admitting that “I [Elizabeth] thought I saw my husband somewhat turning from me”, but not directly saying that Proctor had had an affair with Abigail (The Crucible, 113). Elizabeth’s willingness to sacrifice her own reputation in court to save John’s name shows the significance of reputation. Conjointly, Miller’s nonfiction essay shows the importance of reputation when Miller stands up for his associates accused of communism. When asked by the House

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