Crito Socrates Summary

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Textual Analysis Socrates is in prison where he is waiting for his execution. Early in the morning, Socrates got a visit from his old friend Crito. A dialogue takes place between both of them. Crito is worry about Socrates’ execution the following day. Therefore, Crito has already arranged to get Socrates out of the prison to a safety place out of Athens. Crito presents seven reasons (arguments) in order to persuade Socrates to escape. Crito explains that Socrates’ death will be sad for Crito to lose such a good friend and will reflect a sad situation on his friends because they would think he did nothing to save him. In addition, Socrates should not worry of anything such as the risk it will take to escape or the financial cost his …show more content…
Socrates and Crito agree that one should never do what is wrong and now they are facing a dilemma to stand for this principle or escape for the sake of Socrates. If they stand by this principle, they have to admit that escaping is not the right decision to do. According to Socrates, escaping would be a violation of the law. Moreover, Athens’ society will see this as an action of enmity from Socrates. He cannot do this and break the principle for which he has been stood all his life. However, Crito is not quite convinced about all these because he still believes that Socrates is a victim of an unjust law; reason why Crito believe that it is right for Socrates to disobey the law. Socrates reminds Crito that by taking such an action would be a situation of returning evil for evil. This situation will not only harm his soul and corrupt oneself but will harm the other person as well. It is clear that escape is not in Socrates agenda since he has never believe that by doing two unjust, will make one just. Moreover, that one can fix an unjust situation with another unjust situation. If Socrates escapes from prison, it will be an act of violation against the law, and he does not want to counteract the court’ evil decision. Both friends have made a good discussion about the topic and, at the end both agree that to return injury for injury is not a good exercise that one should take since it

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