Criticism Of Heavy Metal Music

794 Words 4 Pages
Music is the international medium that can link both mind and soul. From sophisticated, well drawn out classical music, to drums and rocks in Aboriginal tribes in Africa, music is a natural and seemingly God-given talent we all possess. “Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent,” it is supernatural yet so uniquely human simultaneously (Hugo). Music elicits response; one main response it draws out is in-depth analysis. As popular as music is, music culture can almost overshadow it, causing questions to be asked on why we are inadvertently affected by the music we listen to. People are affected by music, but speculations can differ depending on the speculator; an individual’s view on the effects …show more content…
It is violent, quick paced, loud music that is, for lack of a better term, undecipherable. Heavy metal music may come off as something straight out of Hades—as my father would say— however, it actually sparks controversy, debating its true effects on the human psyche. Felicity Baker and William Bor write that heavy metal music is “correlated with: assertiveness and aggressiveness, indifference to the feelings of others, moodiness, pessimism, over-sensitivity and discontentment, and increased likelihood to act on impulses” (285). These results directly associate with the overall mood of the genre. Conversely, Derek K. Iwamoto, John Creswell, and Leon Caldwell share Arnette’s (1991) conclusion that heavy metal music caused its listeners to feel “less anxious and stressed” (348). As with every bad situation, there is always at least one supporter; analogically, music that is viewed as deconstructive always has at least one fan. Baker and Bor and Iwamoto, Creswell, and Caldwell all reveal that music (such as heavy metal) has an emotional impact; however, that impact fluctuates between every person that encounters the …show more content…
Humans are wired to recognize a pattern, which is the explanation behind why people tend to have songs stuck in their heads and bring them up frequently; it is a natural cognitive tendency. Considering this function, it comes as no surprise that information taught in school is frequently put to the tune of popular music. When put in a format students easily receive, information can be processed easily and can be recalled quickly. Rap can be used effectively in education all the way to psychiatric assistance (Iwamoto, Creswell, and Caldwell 337). Edmundson, a teacher himself, also believes that music needs to be used scholastically. He synthesizes parallel views from great philosophers such as Plato, Allen Bloom, and Nietzsche who all agree that music and education share a tightly knit relationship (Edmundson). Music affects children from the home to the classroom, and even music seen as destructive by others can be used to further

Related Documents