Criticism Of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

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Within a cognitive behavioral framework, emotions are viewed as a consequence of cognitive change, where the etiological significance of emotions has largely been lowered to a secondary status (Courbasson, Nishikawa & Shapira, 2011). Cognitive behavior therapy has the distinct advantage of helping clients to develop coping skills deemed useful for the present and future. As such, substance abuse clients through cognitive behavioral therapy can practice new coping skills taught and rehearse ways for avoiding or dealing with social situations that could potentially initiate a relapse.
Criticism of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Cognitive behavioral therapy has been criticized for downplaying emotions, failure to focus on the role of the unconscious
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Motivational interviewing has been successfully applied by therapists and social workers without a background in addictions treatment to aid in the recovery of substance abusing parents (Hohman, 1998). Short term motivational therapy types have resulted in successful treatment outcomes of substance abuse through incorporating the elements of feedback, responsibility, advice, menu, empathy and self efficacy (Hohman, 1998). Similarly, the relational elements governing motivational interviewing has been incorporated in interpersonal therapy and are considered suitable for addressing the social isolation component of substance abuse thought to be “a promoter and consequence of the progression of drug dependence” (Brache, 2012, p. 295). Controlled studies have revealed that motivational interviewing is significantly more useful than no treatment for a wide variety of addictive problems including alcohol use, drug use and gambling (Burke, …show more content…
Motivational interviewing however appears to be compatible with cognitive behavior therapy and has successfully been applied in combination to the treatment of substance abuse (Ouimette, Finney & Moos, 1997). The effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy is dependent on individuals’ readiness and willingness to invest time and effort into analyzing their thoughts and feelings as this will provide them with an opportunity to learn more about how their outward behaviors are inevitably impacted by their internal states. Likewise, the success of motivational interviewing is largely based on the therapists’ ability to facilitate therapeutic relationships which are viewed as partnerships indicative of respect of clients’ autonomy. Future studies on the usefulness of both motivational interviewing and cognitive behavioral therapy on substance abuse is needed as present studies have been inadequate in obtaining sound empirical evidence for supporting the use of the therapeutic techniques alluded to

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