Criticism In William Blake's 'The Little Black Boy'

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eighteenth century, William Blake in "The Little Black Boy" intended to romanticize an individual with fanciful ideas or beliefs concerning riches, power and beauty. After all, whether in youth or old age, an African is someone who seems to dream of changing the human condition in an unrealistic manner. The little slave child in Blake's verse is only half-alive in being ruled by hopes and fears of a curious nature (Ogude 1976, 85-96). And Dr. Johnson might have associated Rasselas the Prince of Abyssinia (Ethiopia) with Othello, the Moor of Venice, who as an army general kills his very beautiful wife called Desdemona. Achieving self¬-awareness too late, this unfortunate Blackman sees the European woman as an indispensable jewel ("Pearl") which …show more content…
H. Auden is the leader of British authors of poetry since 1930s. Although he too wrote a lyric that is not directly centred on the Blackman, one of his stanzas alludes to Africa at a remote polar distance from China. Auden's nameless modern lover in "As I Walked Out One Evening" appears young and quite thoughtless, a person behaving as Africans are said to do in European literary works of propaganda interest. In racist terms, he says, it is impossible today for human beings on the Asian and African continents to meet together and attain peaceful co-existence. Implicit in this argument is the fact that blacks are immature lovers who can always hope for an unusual event like the chance to remain virtuous in spite of time, change, and evil in the world. The black mind with a shift towards unreason or depravity is generally backward, hence Rudyard Kipling before Auden could urge the British and other Europeans to supervise a Negro race of cannibals in their colonial empires. Kipling was greatly admired by T. S. Eliot, the Anglo-American man of letters, who wrote "file Hollow Men for his public in Europe and America (Eliot …show more content…
They are poor villagers suffering from malaria, starvation, terror or insecurity, and day¬dreaming. Their fatal state of ill-health, poverty, and ignorance is contrasted with the expatriate's callous treatment of everything they stand for in life: innocence, ambition, and material wealth inside their hot tropical climate. But the whites themselves are known to underrate imminent tragedy of all human actors deep in the "heart of darkness," in view of their lust for violence and racial

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