Criticism And Romanticism In Fitzgerald's Tender Is The Night

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Although the novel is written in the third person omniscient, the beginning of the novel is described in a childish manner, as if the audience is experiencing and observing things through Rosemary’s lens. Thus, the French Riviera is seen with beauty but with naiviety. The illustration of the Riviera is vividly romantic and stunning. Color imagery is dominant in the opening lines of the novel. Among all the colors used to paint the setting of the novel, different hues of pinks and red come out. The “rose-colored hotel,” (1) and “pink and cream of old fortifications,” create a tender, romantic feeling. Delving further into the connotation of pink, it is a mixture of red and white. Red tends to illicit passion and love, while white resembles innocence. …show more content…
Like many of Fitzgerald’s novels, the protagonists, Nicole and Dick Diver share strikingly similar life situations and characteristics. Both Dick and Fitzgerald were a part of World War One and suffer from alcoholism. Nicole and Zelda Fitzgerald share the diagnosis of schizophrenia but also share the status of great wealth. Furthermore, scenes of the novel were inspired by the Fitzgerald’s trip with the Murphys as well as real war grounds such as the hill of Thiepval. Less obvious, the title of novel, Tender is the Night, was inspired by John Keat’s “Ode to a …show more content…
Scott Fitzgerald’s life in his 1933 novel, Tender is the Night. After using a primary source of his creativity as well biographies, it is clear to see that Fitzgerald sewed bits and pieces of himself and his life experiences into his novel. In doing so, it becomes a somewhat skewed, creative autobiography. Tender is the Night clearly shows the importance of a stable, supporting relationship. As Dick and Nicole reach out to outside sources to solve their problems, it becomes more and more clear that there are cracks in their marriage. Likewise, F. Scott and Zelda suffered from many problems thus causing for both to reach elsewhere, straining their relationship. In the novel, this is seen through Rosemary and Dick’s affair as well as Nicole and Tommy’s affair. Fitzgerald’s written work also depicts how one cannot experience and enjoy peace without violence and destruction by contrasting visual imagery. The beautiful, calm French Riviera clashes with the eerie, silent war grounds of hill of Thiepval and Beaumont Hamel. Moreover, Fitzgerald’s characters are inspired by real life people: Gerald and Sara Murphy, Lois Moran, Zelda Fitzgerald, and of course himself. By inserting himself and those close to him in his novel, it reveals insight into who surrounded and influenced Fitzgerald as well as how he perceived himself. In total, the purpose of the investigation was satisfied through extensive research and

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