Criticism And Modernism In Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse Five

1594 Words 7 Pages
Kurt Vonnegut’s unique and preposterous novel Slaughterhouse-Five was peculiar in the sense that it was evoked by misleading ideas, abstract humor, and visual imagery to display post- modernistic style- in it of itself reflecting the fractured psyche of the protagonist, Billy Pilgrim. It was a combination of a unique blend of being fiction and nonfiction. Vonnegut 's novel engrossed postmodernism because it had no limits, it is free and associates with dissonance. He is living his act, never knowing which will come up next. The book is filled with unexpected events and unthinkable surprises, that the author lived through and that fills the reader 's head with limitless questions. Slaughterhouse- Five is a writing piece that is put together …show more content…
From an outward stance, readers often perceive Vonnegut’s book as unusual and detached from ordinary infractures of conventional writings. On the whole, his point is he does not portray resolve in the prescient events that have occurred and will occur. Vonnegut writes as bluntly as the meaningless events of war, but through unconventional style he advocates images of mental instability. In contrast, his novel does not conform with the norm, it is a masterpiece and embraced as an important piece of American literature. All things considered, Vonnegut advertently constructs his novel with interjections intended for his readers to comprehend a tackled ideology of Billy’s war experience with PTSD, through self expression in his writing. Evidently, he wrote this novel in disarray as he noted that it was hardest to recall the historical event that was the firebombing of Dresden, Germany- it was brutally unfathomable. “I thought it would be easy for me to write about the destruction of Dresden, since all I would have to do would be to report what I had seen" (Vonnegut 2). Somethings in life will be turbulent; Billy Pilgrim’s life events are rather present and inevitable in a way that he distances himself from the repercussions to remain unemotional and untouched. There is nothing to change. Vonnegut utilizes a straightforward and …show more content…
He noted in resignation, war is neither heroic nor glamorous. It is messy, very disruption, and especially corrupts the morality of individuals. War is an event that can not be justified. Vonnegut is able to show the readers what war is like, even if it is conveyed through untidy themes. Furthermore, it is sensible to mention that Vonnegut’s literature is not able to actualize the depiction of such catastrophic event that takes part in reality. The disarrangement of his novel in a way prevails the literal state that there is nothing more to say in the novel about war except “poo-tee-weet” because there are no other words to distinguish how ashamed, interruptive, and shocking and useless he perceived the whole thing was. Viewed at the introductory and conclusion of this novel there is complete silence, there is no appropriate interpretation to the horrific occurrence of war- no one knows why a massacre leads to complete silence except for the ringing of the birds."Billy and the rest wandered out onto the shady street. The trees were leafing out. There was nothing going on out there, no traffic of any kind. There was only one vehicle, an abandoned wagon drawn by two horses. The wagon was green and coffin shaped. Birds were talking. One bird said to Billy Pilgrim. 'Poo-tee-weet '?" (215). The birds are incorporated to

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