critical review on the strengths and weaknesses of the proposal on youth leaders training programme for the 21st century

1856 Words Dec 7th, 2013 8 Pages
Introduction
“Proposal writing is essential to the fundraising process, but it can be intimidating for the novice (Geever, 2001)”. Here is the critical review on the strengths and weaknesses of the proposal on youth leaders training programme for the 21st century (“the Programme”) in CCC Ming Yin College (“the College”), which is in hopes of obtaining funds from Quality Education Fund of Hong Kong. Prepared by the Student’s Affairs Committee, the proposal set its goal to benefit the majority of the students in the College.

In this review, apart from the summary of the proposal, I will first set out the strengths and weaknesses, followed by the conclusion. In short, the proposal was written against a comprehensive background,
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In the project description, all questions were answered. It included program design, conflicts management and details of activities in each programme. It could facilitate effective programme as the Programme was well-defined that the staff would be able to perform their duties solely by reading the proposal.

Reader-friendly
In the proposal, the planner tried to tabulate the entire project into charts, showing the chronology of every event within the project. Accordingly, the reader would easily be given a clear picture of the project and thus gave better understanding to it. The funder would be more willing grant fund due to this thoughtful arrangement.

Weakness of the proposal
Despite the fact that the proposal revealed the detailed information about the College, it has its weaknesses and flaws, which make the proposal less convincing for the purpose of fundraising.

Omission of well-founded statement of need
Usually, need assessment is very important to a programme proposal because a programme is supposedly to make change in the organisation and it is expected to fulfil the need of the key members. According to Netting, O’Conner & Fauri (2008), rational planning and prescriptive approaches are often “plans for intervention that work in solving problems”. There contained no a concrete and clear statement of need shown to the potential funder, and therefore the funder would not be able to appreciate the

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