Louis Sullivan Thought Summary

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Thought Louis H. Sullivan is the author of the article “Thought,” he notes that he wants people to think without the use of words. Sullivan conveys that words and the spoken language are a brief moment of thought that is declared out for the world to hear, but to be neglected. In his article, Sullivan encourages people to instead of using words, to try and use our imagination and creativity as a form of thinking in the mind. The use of imagination and creativity is a unique technique, and this technique is constantly being used. He seems to express an issue that he has with words and that words produce difficulty for people to think creatively. In the article, there is a moment of pause due to the ideals of Sullivan’s perspective on the use of words and how it affects an individual’s ability to create and use “thought.” Sullivan believes that thinking consists of symbols, and expressions that do not require the …show more content…
It is suggested that words are fine to use for communicating, but he does not believe that words should be used for creative thinking in the mind. While discussing these topics he connects them to the idea of “thought” and how we must use our creativity and imagination to express our thoughts, instead of depending on words. Sullivan believes that thinking consists of symbols, and expressions that do not require the use of words for their explanations. I disagreed with Sullivan in regards to the limitation of thought without the use of words. It is unrealistic to think abstractly about word or the lack of words in the thought process. Words, or language must be used to express, explain, or understand. Human beings have been able to have expressed with art, symbolism, emotion, physical action, etc. Without the use of words, we cannot express how people experience things. Every person has different thoughts, opinions, and experiences words are needed to express these

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