Critical Analysis Of Miss Representation

1620 Words 7 Pages
Media plays a significant role in gender roles and expectations in Western culture. Since the emergence of televisions in the middle class home in the early twentieth century, images of the ideal woman have driven social and economic development. As technology became more accessible, advertisers projected unrealistic and essentially unattainable standards of beauty that target female insecurities and encourage them to find solace in their products. Movies, television shows, magazines, and other forms of entertainment idolize individuals based off physical characteristics, creating role models that are praised throughout the world. The capitalization gained by corporations based off this insecurity prove to be destructive in female perceptions …show more content…
The documentary began by introducing a mother’s perspective and her skepticism about exposing her daughter to a world driven by media that is both limiting and derogatory to women. According to research, 53% of girls are unhappy at the age of thirteen; this increases by about 20% by the time they turn seventeen, with developing cases of body dysmorphic order. It is proven that women spend over $12,000 - $15,000 per year on beauty, rather than education, suggesting an effort to conform to a society that values physical appearance and behavior as a means of becoming successful. As a result, women suffer through self-objectification, dealing with issues of depression, eating disorders, and lower self-confidence. As a child growing up in the 90’s, I myself fell victim to an ideal of beauty influenced by celebrities such and Britney Spears and Christina Aguilera. I grew up believing that society valued women who entertained others by baring minimal clothing and dancing promiscuously. The lack of coverage of strong female figures in fields such as politics and medicine in adolescent programming reflects the low percentage of women in government. Statistics show that the country is made up of 51% women, yet in Congress, 17% …show more content…
Since I could not identify with the blonde hair, blue eyed aesthetic that was popularized on the big screen, my self-esteem was affected and led me to believe that I may not be desired. Growing up as an introvert, I began to accept my bashfulness as a flaw, since outgoing, expressive personalities were popularized. My struggle to conform or identify with a relatable individual generated self-doubt, and I felt I had more to prove; work harder to be more successful in life. I was encouraged to join a beauty pageant in high school, proving to be quite taxing in my mental and emotional health. The idea of finding validation in the panel’s perception of beauty was reflective of the struggles girls undergo through the influence of media. Thin waists and attractive faces should not reflect one’s opinion of “beauty,” but rather one’s heart and mind. Over time, I removed myself from the danger of being publically objectified and worked on my intrapsychic health and communication. Detaching oneself from social media to clear cognitions stimulated my desire to find inspiration elsewhere instead of through others. I had also gained more confidence in the interpersonal level. My insecurities in the past were evident in my posture and interactions with others. In an attempt to become less noticeable and hide my height, which amplified my discomfort with attention, I would physically attempt to make myself smaller

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