Creon In Antigone: Aristotle's Theory Of Tragedy

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(Add hook) Aristotle 's Theory of Tragedy consists of seven areas that a tragedy must fully consist of: each area breaking into even smaller criteria. Characters, the second category, touches on what the protagonist of a tragedy must have in order to be considered as such. Some of the most noteworthy categories are hamartia, consistency, and tragic downfall. When analyzing the characters of Antigone, the Greek Tragedy written by Sophocles, there a few characters that could appropriately fit into each criterion of the protagonist. However, Creon is most fit for this role. Not only does he possess a majority of the above qualities needed to be considered a protagonist, but his role in the tragedy is greatly impactful: for his motivations are …show more content…
The character trait most important to Aristotle in his theory and to Creon in Antigone is his hamartia, which defines as a tragic flaw. According to Aristotle and basic elements of a tragedy: the protagonist must have some sort of hamartia that will gradually aid in the chain of events of the plot and bring the character to their downfall. This hamartia is what logically connects the protagonist to the other aspects of the tragedy. In Antigone, Creon 's hamartia is, quite evidently, his lack of judgement. At the beginning of the tragedy, Creon was submerged in his new image to the people of Thebes as king. Creon made it clear several times within his monologues that he wanted to do what he should as king: maintain his authority and remain true to his word. Although these sound like proper duties of a king, his newly found authority caused him to become too stringent and unable to exercise flexibility enough to do what is best for the greater good. In shorter words, Creon expected his rules to be followed: whether they were right or wrong. Haemon sheds light on this during his monologue during lines 805-810. "It would be best by far, I admit, if a man were born infallile, right by nature. If not... it 's best to learn from those with good advice" (...) When following Creon 's …show more content…
After the traits and behavior of a character are established, they are unable to change drastically as the story progresses. For example, if the protagonist has a shy personality, the protagonist shouldn 't suddenly become social later. In terms of Creon 's character, his personality is established as prideful, loyal, and stringent. Because Creon is a new ruler, he overaccentuates his values and lets others know how he intends to rule. The reason why these traits remain consistent is because he voices these values until he reaches a point of realization, or anagorisis, and attempts to change his ways. Creon 's traits and values are explained during his beginning monologue and are maintained until the end of the tragedy: specifically when Creon discovers that his entire family has died due to his motivations. "My plans, my mad fanatic heart, my son, cut off so young!" (...) As the plot progresses and each character is effected, Creon holds his ground and stays true to the fourth criterion of Aristotle 's theory of tragedy for characters. Although other characters display this criterion as well, the overpowering pride and loyalty Creon retains shows the most accurate application of character consistency to Aristotle 's theory of tragedy along with

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