Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse-Five Essay

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Crazy people see crazy things becomes a true statement in Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut when a distressed book about a Billy Pilgrim’s life is impacted by what he saw and went through during the war. In Kurt Vonnegut’s book, Billy Pilgrim suffers from severe PTSD that leads him to time travel and being kidnapped by the Tralfamadorians. Slaughterhouse Five was first banned in Oakland County, Michigan and has been since 1972 according to Betsy Morais. The book should be allowed to be read in high schools because it shows the reality of war and the aftermath, PTSD. Although it is challenging to judge a book, books that are fan favorites, share similar characteristics; they are easy to read and have a flow to the story. Slaughterhouse Five was far from having any type of “flow.” Despite the fact that Slaughterhouse Five is somewhat difficult to follow, the storyline and the content are what make the book, a book worth reading. Some books that people like do not have a strenuous vocabulary that makes it difficult to read a book and understand what is being said. Kurt Vonnegut wrote Slaughterhouse Five with an advanced vocabulary and dry sarcasm, that most people do not enjoy or cannot follow. Kurt Vonnegut’s story does not follow the criteria that would consider it a book worthwhile, but the book has more to it than the difficult set-up.
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The book is more than difficult to follow because it jumped around from year to year and life event to life event. Although, this style of writing stressed the true impact that war can have on a soldier and the daily struggles with PTSD. Billy Pilgrim fought during World War II, leading him into a confused state of mind that he will never conquer. Kurt Vonnegut captured the realistic characteristics that follow PTSD, making the book not only interesting, but eye

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