Cranial Nerve Palsy Essay

2132 Words Jul 17th, 2011 9 Pages
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Essay Sample: Page 2
* However, there are some palsies of the sixth nerve that need more time, treatment, and surgery to help with the healing process.

* People with a sixth nerve palsy should refrain from driving unless an eye patch is used. Additionally, certain types of employment may allow a medical leave or a temporary change of duties.



VIII. Sixth Cranial Nerve Palsy: Costs of Services and Treatments

* Computed Tomography (CT) of the head and neck with contrast for the diagnosis of sixth cranial nerve palsy range from $1500-$1900.

* Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the head and neck range from $2500-$5400, depending on the type of test being performed.

* Lumbar Puncture costs range from $2600 - $3500.

* Eye Exams range from $40 - $300, depending on the services and depth of the eye exam.

* Hypertension Checks at your doctor’s office range from$20 - $40. However, it can be done free at any Wal-Mart, free clinic, or family member or friend in the health care profession.

* A Complete Blood Count will range from $15 - $50, depending on whether the test is to be performed with or without a differential.

* Blood Glucose monitoring costs range from $10 - $35 at your local doctor’s office, free at the local free clinic, and free if you have a friend or family member who has diabetes and can do it for you.



IX. Cranial Nerve Palsy: (Conclusion)

* In conclusion, there are twelve
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