Coy Mistress Poem Analysis

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In response to the poem wrote by Andrew Marvell titled “Coy Mistress,” two different authors wrote a response poem to his work. These two authors who wrote the response poem are named Annie Finch and A. D. Hope, and while their response is wrote in not only a different perspective, but the poems are different as well. The response poem authors will not address everything that is said in the original poem, but they will both give a different insight for what is said from the female point of view. By providing a female perspective, if even it is from a different author, shows how women were treated with a different mindset and with even the possibility of appearing helpless. Women were often treated as objects of display, eye candy if you will, …show more content…
D. Hope both take different tones and methods to addressing the problem of the gentlemen, they are both similar and yet, very different in some aspects. In Finch’s poem, she was able to represent the issues of gender through having her narrator reject Andrew’s character because she believes that women should not sleep with men simply because they desire it to be that way. While Hope’s character believed that if were to address women with respect, he would be able to easily entertain more females and she would have warmed to the idea if his language were different. The overall tone and formality of Annie’s poem is thought to be informal; the narrator begins the poem addressing the gentlemen as sir, but soon stops and speaks as if she knows him.Though Annie’s character is somewhat hostile towards the gentlemen, she uses an elaborate language to refuse him and she is entertained by doing so. Unlike Annie’s character, Hope’s character seems to remain formal for most of the poem and the character seems to have an overall more sympathetic, but has a witty, informative and motherly tone throughout the response …show more content…
D. Hope’s response poem, there is many a evidence that she too supports the idea of women being able to deny what is expected of them and allow women to live as they please. In the poem, the narrator states that “Slight faults…. Your sex is generally prone.” (A. D. Hope 12-13). This quote is significant in the aspect of that the narrator admits that she herself has faults, but males tend to have a better luck with obtaining faults. The narrator of Hope’s poem addresses herself as a lady like the other poem by Annie Finch, but instead, Hope has her character go more into depth about the behavior of the gentlemen she is addressing. Hope’s character believes that no woman is won over with just words and comparisons to graves, but that women are won over by

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