Counterculture Essay

1394 Words 6 Pages
Whether it is realized or not, music is a very prevalent tool in the American society. From commercial jingles to songs about love, music can be used to mirror the ideals of a culture and provide insight to specific, recurring themes throughout history. “…Comparative musicology, which is the study of musical styles and systems from different societies, an integral part of general musicology; and musical anthropology, the study of the role music plays in human societies, an integral part of general anthropology.” (Turino 1525) It was not until the birth of Rock and Roll that music really began to blatantly share ideas and grievances of the youth of the United States. But there was none so prevalent an era as the 60s that used music as a powerful …show more content…
The youth culture that had been gaining in size and prominence as the baby boomers came of age came into its own during the 1960s. This was the period of the Vietnam War, and youthful idealism and wealth were dampened by the ugliness of a war that would not go away. (Salamone 187). “The counterculture was a mass movement comprised mostly of young Americans who began to see the possibilities of new and expanded thinking beyond merely the political and of how they lived their lives.”(Walkowitz 216). The new “subculture” essentially was the beginning of radical change in the lives of many Americans. The young adults of the 60s questioned the values of the 50s. No more was life like the TV shows “Father Knows Best” or “Leave it to Beaver”. Those who avidly sort to change the norms of American life would become known as “Hippies” and “Flower Children”. They questioned the authority of government (who really was running the country, probably crusty old white men), corporations (those who control the economy can rule the country, if something happened to the economy, we would all be affected) and schools of all establishments (what if what they are teaching are all lies, censorship is the enemy). Most all these young adults questioned the validity of war. “The counterculture was no more a 'culture ' than a diverse antiwar movement.” Historians used the term “counterculture” in attempt …show more content…
By the end of the song, its the soldiers’ graves’ that are then covered in flowers. To only did they sing of political issues, but social as well. The social message is very prevalent in Seeger’s “We Shall Overcome”. Their music really connected to the college students who needed something else than mainstream

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