Cost Issues In Healthcare

1176 Words 5 Pages
Healthcare has been at the forefront of confrontation for centuries. From the first implementation of the U.S Marine Hospital in 1798 to the execution of Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) in its current state, the questions of who will pay, who will have access and what is going to be the quality of care remains a challenge. Healthcare as we know will always come at a cost. Someone will need to pay for the services rendered as nothing is free. How much you pay, often speaks to the quality of care one will receive. Accessing for care continues to be a dilemma, even for those that have coverage. In 1798 the first Federal law was signed by John Adams, the “Act for the Relief of Sick and Disabled Seaman” which was the start of pre-paid …show more content…
This was much different than coverages in the past, that focus was more about permanent injury or death coverage. President Roosevelt tried to push for national insurance; due to limited health insurance coverage and the limited skills of providers. The country was not ready and most likely not well educated of the benefits of care for all. Changes occurred in 1929, when Baylor University Hospital, contracted with a group of 1,250 teachers for health coverage at the cost of a bimonthly fee of 50 cents. The coverage was known as Blue Cross Blue Shield. (Sherrow, 2009). The coverage grew from minor care to covering hospital and physician fees. Although the coverage for teachers was implemented this didn’t cover the average person. A poll taken in 1932 an independent group, Committee on the Cost of Medical Care, published a report on the increase to healthcare and the number of people going untreated. (Sherrow, 2009). Much of the reason for limited access to care was driven by the Great Depression. Although Social Security was passed and enacted, it left little for the growing number of elderly and poor. Insurance was limited more to the working …show more content…
In 1997, Children’s Health Insurance Coverage (CHIP) was created to cover children and make sure that they had the ability to receive care in all 50 states. The Medicare program moved forward in 2003 with Part D, The Medicare Prescription Drug Improvement and Modernization Act (MMA). Starting in 2010, the long hall forward to have a more universal healthcare system was passed as most would know as The Obamacare and to others know it in the form of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The goal of ACA was to make sure all in the U.S citizens had access to healthcare. The increase of Medicaid patients increased to and those that did not qualify for Medicaid had the choice to purchase a Co-Op’s plan. In 2015 the average increase of Medicaid enrollment by 13.8 percent. (Rudowitz, Snyder &Smith, 2015). There were 23 CO-OP plans that launched in 2013; however, the federal funding was limited and due to the lack of customers, twelve of these plans closed. (Corlete, Miskell, Lerche & Giovannelli, 2015) Although there was coverage it did not guarantee that Hospitals or Physicians would contract to take CO-OP’s or open their practices. This left many access to care and specialty care in the same place as it did prior to ACA

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