Theme Of Green Light In The Great Gatsby

1028 Words 5 Pages
Thomas Hilfiger once mentioned in his memoir, “The road to success is not easy to navigate, but with hard work, drive and passion, it is possible to achieve the American dream.” Within the veins of every American streams the positive motivation to thrive. The Great Gatsby, a novel by Scott Fitzgerald, embodies one of the most significant themes which is related to the corruption of the American dream. The American Dream is a social philosophy of the United States, the set of standards in which freedom includes the opportunity for wealth and achievement. The Great Gatsby exhibits to all the readers what has occurred to the American Dream in the early twentieth century, which is the time when the thoughts and ideas start to develop corruption …show more content…
‘Why of course you can!’” Gatsby’s false conception is still lingering around his mind that all the past can still be true and is part of his vision he has always hunted. When Gatsby stands along the port and stretches his arms toward a green light where Daisy lives, he thinks of Daisy incessantly. The green light is one of the most significant symbols in this novel, and it becomes evident that this very green light is not Daisy herself, but a mark that signifies Gatsby’s fantasy of having and living with Daisy. The green light as symbols of hope, wealth, power, that through the green light, the American Dream endows Gatsby the strength to follow his lifetime aspiration. Because Gatsby believes that appearances are the essence aspect of expectation that every girl desires, he dresses up perfectly with his handmade outfits and fancy cars. He wants Daisy visions him as a perfect American Dream standardized man, “We both looked down at the grass – there was a sharp line where my ragged lawn ended and the darker, well-kept expanse of his began. I suspected he meant my grass." (80) Because Gatsby refuses to believe that what have passed cannot be …show more content…
She has a desire for a luxurious life, which is not granted by her husband, Wilson lures her into having an affair with Tom. Having an affair, Myrtle significantly harms the marriage with George that eventually leads to losing of true happiness and even death. When Myrtle once married to Wilson, she regrets it immediately after knowing that Wilson grants her nothing, and she says, “The only crazy I was was when I married him. I knew right away I made a mistake. He borrowed somebody’s best suit to get married in, and never told me about it, and the man came after it one say when he was out." (Fitzgerald, 39) Materialism and short-eyed characteristics reflect the real personality of Myrtle. She diminishes Wilson by criticizing his inability to buy his suits. However, Tom in the other hand was Myrtle 's ideal person, that epitomizes the poster of the American Dream, who can help her achieves and accomplishes all her dreams by materialistically buying whatever she likes or wants. Myrtle is a lower-class citizen who is frantic to know what an upper-classes’ lifestyle would be, and she desires to be one of them despicably by deliberately attract Tom. However, everything has its ending story, so does Myrtle. She gets hit by a car that appears to her as her lover’s, but ironically it is Daisy who drove that car flies her up into the air and kills

Related Documents