Correctional Institutions Case Study

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THE EFFICACY OF OUR CORRECTIONAL INSTITUTIONS: A CASE OF MEETING OBJECTIVES OR ARE WE SCORING OWN GOALS?
THESIS STATEMENT
Correctional institutions are meant to help the state reduce the prevalence of criminal conduct in the society. Additionally, it is meant to help society itself by dealing with the individuals who are involved in the commissions or omissions that are viewed by penal law as crimes. It is the role of the law to define what a crime is. The courts interpret the law in light of a factual case and determine whether an accused person ought to be committed to jail. At the tail end, the jail terms, as part of the other methods of punishment are aimed at meting out what is just to the persons who have committed the said crimes. This
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In this case, the objective of imprisonment is, by way of restraining liberty, deter the convict form committing the crime once they are set free. However, there is ample evidence form research to the effect that over 50% of persons who are committed to prison especially as first offenders go ahead to commit other crimes. To this extent, this objective of the prison system appears to be lost. (Levitt, 2005) Additionally there is no evidence to the effect that those who do not commit crime in society are law abiding because of the fear of prison walls. It cannot be disputed that all persons of lucid minds would not be readily willing to commit a crime due to the fear of imprisonment. However, there are more effective ways of dealing with habitual offenders. According to Daniel Nagin, it is only the certainty of behind caught that deters criminals form committing criminal conduct and not the actual terms of imprisonment. As a matter of fact, prisoners become hardened and learn from each other in prison as to the best ways of commission of crimes. (Nagin, …show more content…
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James, L., 2011. An exploration of community reentry needs and services for prisoners: a focus on care to limit return to high-risk behavior.. AIDS patient care and STDs , 25(8), pp. 475-481.
Kanazawa, S., 2009. Evolutionary psychology and crime.. 1 ed. New York: Routledge.
Levitt, S., 2005. "Understanding why crime fell in the 1990s: Four factors that explain the decline and six that do not.. The Journal of Economic Perspectives, 18(1), pp. 163-190.
Marshall, T., 1998. . Restorative justice: An overview.. s.l.:Center for Restorative Justice & Mediation.
Nagin, D., 2013. Deterrence in the Twenty First Century. In: M. Tonry, ed. in Crime and Justice in America: 1975-2025. Chicago: Chicago Press, pp. 199-264.
Reiman, J. & Leighton., P., 2015. The rich get richer and the poor get prison: Ideology, class, and criminal justice.. 1 ed. New York:

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