Corporate Governance In Bangladesh Case Study

12057 Words 49 Pages
Register to read the introduction… OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY The objectives of the study are     To provide an understanding of corporate governance, To provide an analysis of corporate governance environment in Bangladesh. To present the hindrance in having good corporate governance and to understand the corporate governance culture in the corporate sector in Bangladesh. To analysis the various corporate governance …show more content…
Corporate Governance in the Financial Institutions (FIs): The need for a competent financial sector is important to stimulate and support economic growth through efficient resource allocation. Good CG practices are essential to the effectiveness, competitiveness and safety and soundness of financial institutions. Streamlining the Guidelines with the Code of Corporate Governance: A Code of CG has been published by BEI can be streamlined to reduce duplication and resources to comply with CG requirements for the FIs. Protection of depositors: Given the special nature of banking institutions, a broad view of CG where regulation of banking activities is required to protect depositors. In developed economies, protection of depositors in a deregulated environment is typically provided by a system of prudential regulation, but in developing economies such protection is undermined by the lack of well-trained supervisors, inadequate disclosure requirements, the cost of raising bank capital and the presence of distributional cartels. Improvements in prudential regulation: Liberalization policies need to be gradual, and should be dependent upon improvements in prudential regulation. Bangladesh needs to expend resources enhancing the quality of their financial …show more content…
The quality of the information is checked, and its circulation is adapted to the use that must be made of it. The NGO’s financial management is impartial. The notion of the NGO’s impartial management must be subject to internal discussion, because it can be interpreted in different ways. Synergy Quality defines it as follows: ‘The people who manage and administer the NGO, by themselves or by people who intervene for them, have no direct or indirect advantage from the financial results of the operations’. The balance between administrative and organizational costs and the resources allocated to the operational projects is to be examined regularly, out of concern for efficiency. Good governance, for example, has a cost, but it contributes to improving the interventions to the beneficiary’s advantage. The building up of reserves, investments, loans, guarantees and deposits is governed by the required rules of exactness and carefulness. The representative bodies: The representative bodies of the internal stakeholders can be consulted before a significant expenditure is made (purchase of buildings, for example). The members of a Board of Trustees of an NGO must be volunteers. Forces Against and For Corporate Governance Resistance comes from vested interests (oligopolists, relationship-based investors) who want to retain status quo.

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