Conversations With Leaders: Principles Of Effective Writing Instruction

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According to a study done by Achieve Inc. in 2005, fifty percent of students that graduate high school are not prepared for college-level writing (Santrock, 2011, 370). While this lack of preparedness roots all the way back to the beginning of learning how to write, a great deal of knowledge about becoming a better writer can be learned in high school English classes if the teachers apply different writing techniques. In chapter eleven of John Santrock’s textbook Educational Psychology and Sharon Zumbrunn and Keegan Krause’s article “Conversations with Leaders: Principles of Effective Writing Instruction” many best practices for teaching writing are given in hopes to provide teachers with numerous ways to teach their students to become better …show more content…
Writing proficiency is below grade levels across the country; therefore, teaching practices must be a concern when looking to improve students’ writing abilities. This article mentions something that Santrock also stated, finding effective ways to teach writing can be difficult because students are all at different skill levels. (Zumbrunn and Krause, 2012, 346). To determine the best way to teach writing, interviews were done with important authorities in the area of writing who concluded …show more content…
When the students can see what the point of the writing they are doing is, they will be more willing to learn writing techniques. Along with this, teachers need to be flexible with their lesson plans as different questions or examples will come up that were not planned. For example, if there is a speech given by the president, it is a great opportunity to look at the conventions and rhetoric of the speech in class with students (Zumbrunn and Krause, 2012, 349). Oftentimes teachers only have their students write for a brief portion of the school year, and with all the other subjects that need to be taught in order to do well on state assessments, writing is the easiest to cut. In order to see a positive change is students’ writing ability, there must be writing done every day. Teachers must think creatively in order to implement writing practice into other activities. In a secondary English classroom, this is an easier task as writing is a larger component, but it can still be difficult, as there are many other topics to cover as well. With all of these, “effective writing instruction includes more than just daily practice. It focuses on individual student needs and provides instruction to help students meet their goals” (Zumbrunn and Krause, 2012, 349). Teachers should begin their time with students with a writing activity that will

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