The American Revolution: The English And The American Colonists

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Since the dawn of history, nations have been plagued with conflicts that have shaped society for what it has become today. Events as substantial and influential as these have often been the result of Revolutions. A key example would be the American Revolution. The American Revolution ultimately began in 1775 with the Battle of Lexington & Concord after a series of escalating conflicts. It ended with the Treaty of Paris in 1783. Leading up to independence, there were many recurring controversies and conflicts involving the English and the American Colonists. Most of these stemmed from economic restrictions set forth by the British Parliament towards the colonists, leading us to the conclusion that the origins of the American Revolution were …show more content…
They did impose laws, such as the Navigation Acts which restricted trade, however the English did not enforce the laws, since they were over 3,000 miles of sea apart. In 1721, the Prime Minister Robert Walpole did not enforce the Navigation Acts, since he saw that profitable illegal trade was beneficial in allowing colonists to buy more English goods. The Navigation Acts were an attempt to put the theory of Mercantilism into effect on the colonies. Certain laws, like the Molasses Act of 1733 were passed, but never enforced. If the English had paid attention to smugglers, the colonists would have been taxed for molasses and sugar, especially the New England colonists who did constant trade with the West Indies. Walpole stated, “If no restrictions were placed on the colonies, they would flourish.” This policy continued until 1763, when the French and Indian War came to an end. The year 1763 is often seen as a turning point in the relationship of the colonies and Britain, because Britain began to pass countless taxation laws, and began enforcing the Navigation Acts previously passed. The Navigation acts enforced the policy of Mercantilism, where the colonies sent materials, and the mother country sent back finished products for sale. The colonists began to be put under heavy restrictions by the English. In 1764, the Sugar Act was passed by the British Parliament and its purpose was to …show more content…
Following a period of Salutary Neglect, the Colonists were put under heavy taxation. Daily items which were key to individuals, such as tea, were highly taxed, likewise with paper. The Colonies were also subject to use for Britain’s policy of Mercantilism. They were forced to send raw materials and buy back products. These reasons, heavy taxation and mercantilism, which were economic matters, eventually lead to the onset of war between the Americans and the British. It is argued that the origins of the American Revolution were ideological, however the economic issues that were going on were more significant and responsible for the many protests, and rebellions. Ideas from the enlightenment period played a small role because when most of these books were written, the taxation had already been an established as a major problem with the

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