Use Of Abuse Of Power In Animal Farm By George Orwell

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War happens throughout history, and in it, there are always people that try to gain power and abuse it. It can be revolutionaries or rebels but it can also be our own leaders. The story “Animal Farm” by George Orwell is an allegorical novel that satires political leaders that abuse their power. Orwell strongly supports the idea that absolute power results in corruption, and uses his characters to show this. The story revolves around this farm of animals that decided to take over the farm. After they rebelled one of the pigs, Napoleon took control of the leadership role but soon as the time passed by, the more the power went to his head and controlled him. Napoleon and the pigs stay in control of the power in the farm by using intimidation on …show more content…
Napoleon uses his control of the dogs to forcefully make the animals submit from fear. On page 54 it was stated, “Napoleon let out deep, menacing growls, and the pigs fell silent…(54).” This quote shows that Napoleon doesn’t flinch about scaring his own comrades into being mute. The power already is his main focusing, he doesn’t even care about the actions he takes as long as he is in control. Napoleon enlists fear and intimidation in the animals by threatening them with physical force. Napoleon ordered this to happen, “...the dogs promptly tore their throats out, and in a terrible voice Napoleon demanded…(84).” With just speaking Napoleon can order someone's death, it’s terrifying how he doesn’t hesitate to do so. The animals would be petrified, that their own leader broke the farms rule about not killing each other. If he doesn’t hesitate to break one law, he can break more. Napoleon silences the animals with the power he has over them. This was what happened to the animals when they saw what Napoleon ordered, “Too amazed and frightened to speak…(53).” It is one thing to send vicious dogs to attack your enemy, but Napoleon does it to his friend just because they challenged his power. It wasn’t even that long since he came to power with Snowball, but he takes the fastest chance to get rid of him so he is the only one in power. Napoleon …show more content…
Squealer(one of the pigs) taps into the fears all the animals have by bringing the idea that Jones could come back. Squealer uses the animals fears, “Do you know what would happen if we pigs failed in our duty? Jones would come back! Yes, Jones would come back! Surely there is no one among you who wants to see Jones come back (36)?” Squealer knows that the animals are terrified just by the idea of Jones returning and uses it. He makes the animals feel that they need the pigs to survive, so they don’t challenge the seat of authority. Squealer connects with the animals sympathy to calm them down and make them believe that he and the pigs are doing it for them. Squealer connects to them by saying this, “...your sake... we drink that milk and eat those apples (36).” Squealer blatantly manipulates the animals feelings by lying to them, he only cares about staying in power and not his friends. He only has a smidge of the power Napoleon has but it has already got its control over him. Old Major brings into play his and the animals fellowship to increase his credibility and trustworthiness. This is what Old Major said, “Weak or strong… we are all brothers…(11).” Old Major uses old folks, a type of propaganda to act like they are all equal. He tries to bring everyone together even if not everything he is saying is true. Napoleon and the pigs exploit

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