June Etta Downey Contributions To Psychology

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¨[June Etta Downey is] endowed with an unusually alert and discerning mind and with a maturity of judgement extremely infrequent in students her age.¨ Spoke former president of Yale University, James Rowland Angell, whom Downey had worked under for her doctorate degree. Her contributions to the Science of Psychology left her with many honors and achievements by the end of her life time. Not only did she contribute to the field of Psychology, but to the advancement of women in society. She made advancements never thought possible of a woman, despite the negative gender stereotype.
Before all her success, Downey grew up in the small town of Laramie, Wyoming. Born to an Evangeline (Owen) Downey and Stephen Wheeler Downey, as the second of nine
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The Downey Will-Temperament Test created a basis for the study and testing of personality. This was one of the first tests to evaluate character traits separate from the individual 's intellectual capacity. It was also the first to use psychographic methods in its interpretation, which is the use of graphs or interrelated subtests as opposed to strictly numerical results for a more complete impression of the individual. Psychologists also praise the test as a nonbiased exam, this test was extremely useful for those of another race or ethnicity than the white majority because it emphasized motor actions and didn´t favor or care for any particular group (Hogan, …show more content…
In addition to psychological advancements, Downey also opened a door to many women. She was the first woman named Head of Department at a state University in 1905, one of the first two women admitted to membership in the Society of Experimental Psychologists in 1929, served on the Council of the American Psychological Association from 1923 to 1925, and received an election as a Fellow of the American Association for Advancement of Science. In her honor, her family members set up a June Etta Downey Fund. This fund supported professional attitudes, restore the June E. Downey Seminar Room, and support women in the Psychology Department of the University of Wyoming. More recently, in 1999, long after her death, Downey was a finalist of the ¨Wyoming Citizen of the Century¨ award, demonstrating that her work still impacts society today (James, James, Boyer,

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