Contradicts The Efficiency Of Multitasking

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A high school student is laying on his bed, finishing homework due the next day. A radio plays in the background to fill the void of silence. His phone vibrates, it 's a text from his mother. He quickly replies to keep mother happy. The student looks back at the textbook and continues to work on the homework. Suddenly, his favorite song plays over the radio. He closed his eyes and purely listened to the song. Over with, he is back to complete the homework. In this example from above, the high school student is actually performing a process called task switching, or multitasking. Maybe not the same fast paced multitasking that many has come to use, but still considered to be multitasked. In general, any process of switching between actions, …show more content…
Poldrack, PhD, a neuroscience professor at the University of California, Los Angeles, in 2006. The experiment asked the participants to sort cards into different categories. In the first few trials, he asked the participants to dedicate themselves solely to separating the card. While in the rest of the trials, participants had to simultaneously sort the cards and count the number of high-pitched beeps playing in the background. Every participant had their time to complete the action, accuracy to sort the cards, and score of a generic test about the cards collected as data. When reviewing the results, not only the times of the trials decreased, but participants retained less information about the cards while counting pitches than without counting pitches …show more content…
In an experiment by Lori Altmann, an associate professor of speech, language and hearing sciences at the College of Public Health and Health Professions, and Chris Hass, an associate professor of applied physiology and kinesiology in the College of Health and Human Performance, participants were challenged to complete cognitive test while pedaling on a bicycle. The speed of the participants on the bicycle were collected with no cognitive test and progressively harder cognitive test. Results show that people had an increase of 25 percent in speed while completing the simple cognitive test than without any cognitive test. Although the speed of participants decreased as the test difficulty increased, the speed while completing the hardest test was about the same as without any tests. “As participants were doing the easy tasks, they were really going to town on the bikes, and they didn’t even realize it,” Altmann said. “It was as if the cognitive tasks took their minds off the fact that they were pedaling”

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