Respiratory Synthesis Essay

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During exercise, more oxygen is being consumed by the body. As such, more ATP is required by the muscles that are involved in the contracts from the exercise. This results in a greater amount of oxygen being needed in order to make the ATP to be supplied to the body for it to be used as energy. The increased consumption of ATP requires the body to release more thyroid hormone. In order for this to happen, the body must also undergo more cellular respiration in order to consumer more oxygen. The stimulus for this sequence of events is the decrease in the available supply of ATP. In order to return the reduced levels of ATP back to normal, the body must increase respiration in order to release more carbon dioxide. Even after the muscles have …show more content…
The primary sensors for carbon dioxide are known as peripheral chemoreceptors, located within the both the carotid artery and aortic artery. These changes in carbon dioxide levels are detected within the blood and cause changes to the blood pH levels. An increase in carbon dioxide within the plasma of the blood results in an increase in H+ ions and HCO3- molecules, stimulating the peripheral chemoreceptors. This directly affects the sensory neurons that control respiratory control centers, leading to an increase in ventilation as represented by figure 4. Carbon dioxide is generated as a byproduct within the cells of the body during aerobic metabolism. In order to accomplish the crucial act of removing carbon dioxide from the body, it is transported within the blood to the lungs to be exhaled in three manners; carried physically while dissolved in blood; chemically through being combined with blood proteins as carbamino compounds; and chemically as bicarbonate. Roughly 7% of carbon dioxide within the body is dissolved directly into the blood plasma. Another 70% is converted into the bicarnonate ion. The mechanism for this reaction is: CO2 + H2O H2CO3 H+ + HCO3-. The remaning 23% is then bound to hemoglobin to form carbaminohemoglobin. In contrast, oxygen is transported via two different pathways. Roughly 98% of oxygen is bound to hemoglobin to form oxyhemoglobin, while the other 2% is dissolved directly into the blood

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