Examples Of Gilded Age In The Great Gatsby

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In the early 1900’s the United states was a powerhouse, they were the top industrial producer in the world along with the economy being at its highest in history. But this time was not as shiny and new as it seemed. Mark Twain coined the 1920’s as the “Gilded Age” for a reason. While everyone was buying up the newest models and highest fashions as fast as they possibly could; the country was forming a bubble that would soon burst. There were tow sides to the economy the few who had rich luxurious lifestyles from being rich before or made their way in the world or the silent majority created by those who were less notoriously known. Those on the lower half scrounged for survival in the new system, while the upper half enjoyed the new extravagance …show more content…
Scott Fitzgerald protested the new system. In his book The Great Gatsby, he tells a tragic love story that hints at the underlying issues of society and economy in the mid-1920’s.Using each character to represent an issue. This story is told from the viewpoint of a side character named Nick Carraway, who Fitzgerald embodies. Nick has recently moved from Chicago to New York City’s West Egg. Where he lives across the bay from his cousin Daisy Buchanan who married a man, Tom, who comes from a long line of wealthy …show more content…
It is important to understand that the 1920’s were not good for everyone nor bad for everyone it depended on many factors. Through Strauss 's view, he was fearful of the new system because he understood this prosperous time would come to an end and wanted the people to stop being ignorant with their money. Chase falls into a group Strauss talks about where they are clueless why it’s happening, but he also looks at a specific industry to better understand the situation and its fluctuations. Fitzgerald makes his voice known through I his novel on a number of opinions. All three men had the feeling the new consumerism would bring a negative effect to America. Most of the sources could not have predicted the extent of which the economy fell. The United States still struggles with consumerism today especially in terms of meeting demand internally, now most of U.S. products are manufactured and imported due to the exponential rate of

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