Construction Of DNA, DNA And Protein By Building Models

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Construction of DNA, RNA, And Protein By Building Models

Introduction
Nucleic acids are made of nucleotides. When these nucleic acids form sequences they create either DNA or RNA. DNA and RNA are composed of a phosphate, a sugar, and a nitrogen base. The main difference in RNA and DNA is that uracil replaces the base of thymine in RNA. Proteins are essential to maintaining cells by creating hormones and enzymes, and defending the cell. The arrangement of DNA and RNA bases dictates what protein is formed. When DNA is separated into a single strand, ribonucleotides attach to one of the strands and form messenger RNA (mRNA), through the process of transcription. When the gene is turned into a protein sequence by transfer RNA (tRNA), it is called
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The two single DNA strands were reconnected using remaining hydrogen bond connectors and saved.

Part Three
Anticodons were built by placing the following groups of three nitrogen bases on tRNA models: cytosine, uracil, and adenine (CUA); cytosine, guanine, and guanine (CGG); adenine, uracil, and guanine (AUG).
Anticodons were attached to their complementary codons using hydrogen bond connectors and each amino acid was bonded to its respective tRNA.
The amino acid models were bonded together using the white bonding tubes.
The amino acid sequence was detached and compared.
All parts were detached and returned to bag.

Results
In this lab, a DNA model was constructed and then the bonds were broken and a single strand of DNA was created. The single strand was then open to having ribonucleotides attached to it, in which a mRNA was then modeled. In theory, after the construction of the mRNA, it would pass into the cytoplasm and be translated into an amino acid sequence and converted to tRNA. After we modeled the tRNA an amino acid would attach onto the strand come together until the protein is
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Transcription: process of making RNA copy of DNA molecule, which becomes mRNA
Translation: process of decoding mRNA
Draw a diagram of your DNA molecule. Keep the illustration in a straight, ‘ladder’ form as seen in figure 2; do not attempt to draw double helix shape. Specifically identify each nitrogen base.

A partial strand of DNA has the nitrogen base pattern shown below. Indicate what nitrogen bases would be needed for a mRNA to complement this strand.
Cytosine
Guanine
Adenine
Uracil
Cytosine
Guanine
Thymine
Adenine
Thymine
Adenine
Guanine
Cytosine
Cytosine

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