The Industrial Revolution In Communist Manifesto By Karl Marx

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Karl Marx, in his Communist Manifesto, sought to explain the consequences of the Industrial Revolution as a piece of the grand scheme of history-moving towards revolution. The greater labeling of factory workers as mere commodities caused further divide between the bourgeoisie and the proletarians, which, according to Marx, would ultimately result in the fall of the bourgeoisie and the commencement of the Communist Revolution. Meanwhile, artists reacted in many different ways to the changing times due to the rise of industry. They would depict in vivid fashion how bad the revolution affected cities and the people in them, emphasize nature as a counter to modernization, or even leave any kind of modern urban life altogether, in hopes of being …show more content…
It depicts the consequences of industrialization on both a social and physical level. The workers in the painting are trudging back through the dirty streets after a long day of grunt work. The sky is grey with smoke and makes the world seem dark, while the laborers who were cast off from the workforce were simply biding their time by sitting in the dirt, with presumably nowhere to go, or nothing else to do besides hope to find work. It is also worth noting that the laborers in the painting are predominantly face-less, which further implies the anonymity of the workers as identical tools that could be …show more content…
In order for the revolution to be ignited, conditions of the proletarian workers had to become so wretched and poor that it incited an uprising. The Industrial Revolution was one of the final pieces of the equation necessary for establishing Communism. Artists, however, established that they were not laborers who needed an uprising. While the Industrial Revolution certainly affected their income and prosperity, they continued to creatively produce their works, whether it was criticizing the industrial society, ignorant of the current state of industry and poverty, or utterly absent of modern society at all, and focused on the embrace of nature over urban

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