Psychological Determinants Of Criminal Behaviour Essay

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There are many factors that contribute to the likelihood of an individual committing criminal behaviour, including their socioeconomic environment, psychological disturbances, and early childhood experiences. Compiled case studies have determined that there is a stronger correlation with external factors that influence thinking than genetic predisposition or inherent nature. Psychology is an important area of research in criminology, with respects to understanding the internal precursors that lead to deviance. Exposure to varying conditions of social institutions and their effects are also relevant to the analysis the rates of criminal activity. Furthermore, individuals living in poor economic conditions have been shown to be likelier to participate in criminal …show more content…
The causes behind criminal behaviour are variables dependent on individual experiences which affect the levels of susceptibility to commit deviance. The debate on nature versus nurture becomes relevant in determining crime prevention and rehabilitation, but the exploration of both areas are necessary to effectively gather insight. Understanding genetic predisposition is of importance, but the varying environments produced from our current societal structure is crucial in assessment of causes leading to criminal behaviour. Many studies have utilized psychological approaches in examining factors that may drive an individual to commit a crime. Evidence states that delinquency is often the expression of psychological pressures that require recognition and action. Criminals have been divided into five types: individuals driven to crime by their overwhelming external circumstances, seemingly normal individuals driven by overwhelming impulses, neurotic individuals driven by unrecognizable impulses which they attempt to repress, individuals who

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