Conpretation Of The Harlot Rahab In James 2: 25 And 26

3125 Words 13 Pages
Register to read the introduction… Abraham was the friend of God and the father of the Jewish people but Rahab is referred to as hē pornē, or the harlot. Even though Rahab’s biblical career was darkened by her chose profession, it was her righteous acts that got her honorable mention in the book of James and his argument for a faithful life. James’ choice of her as this example puzzles many commentators. He relatively minor role in Scripture only deepens the mystery around his selection. Only referred to once in the Old Testament and only one other time in the New Testament (Hebrews 11:31). James uses the same verb to indicate justification for Rahab as he did for Abraham ἐδικαιώθη.

Conclusion
The conclusion for this passage in James 2:18-26 could not be more clear. Faith and deeds are inextricably intermixed in the Christian life. They are as essential to one another as water and air to man’s existence. James provides clear evidence that apart from the spirit (chōris) or from the (pneumatos) “breath” of life, the body is dead. His use of Abraham and Rahab appear to have the proper broad appeal to carry the message that “if faith is experienced apart from works, faith may be deemed dead. It is certainly not real. True faith continually contributes to spiritual growth and development.

Appendix A: Block Diagram of James
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Douglas Moo, The Letter of James, The Pillar New Testament Commentary Series (Grand Rapids: Eerdsman, 2000), 43.
[ 9 ]. Ibid. ,126
[ 10 ]. Sophie Laws, The Epistle of James, Black’s New Testament Commentary (London: Continuum, 1980), 123.
[ 11 ]. Jane Heath. The Righteous Gentile Interjects (James 2:18-19 and Romans 2:14-15). Novum Testamentum 55, no. 3 (2013): 272-95. ATLA Religion Database with ATLASerials, EBSCOhost (accessed March 8, 2015).
[ 12 ]. Rick Brannan and Israel Loken, The Lexham Textual Notes on the Bible, Lexham Bible Reference Series (Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2014), Jas 2:19.
[ 13 ]. George M. Stulac, James, The IVP New Testament Commentary Series (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1993), Jas 2:19.
[ 14 ]. Sophie Laws, The Epistle of James, Black’s New Testament Commentary (London: Continuum, 1980), 133.
[ 15 ]. Marvin Richardson Vincent, Word Studies in the New Testament, vol. 1 (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1887), 745.
[ 16 ]. Sophie Laws, The Epistle of James, Black’s New Testament Commentary (London: Continuum, 1980), 137.
[ 17 ]. J. Ronald Blue, “James,” in The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures, ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck, vol. 2 (Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985),

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