Connotation In The Declaration Of Independence Analysis

766 Words 4 Pages
Chains of oppression clank together, rubbing the flesh of the colonists’ hopes raw. Britain’s merciless rule has turned the colonies into a desolate and forlorn setting with a quality of life worse than death. As a result, the colonies unanimously decide to sever the chains of despotism and become the Thirteen United States of America. On July 4, 1776, Congress adopts a document written by Thomas Jefferson which vindicates the liberation of the colonies. Thomas Jefferson supports his purpose of justifying declaring independence from the British in the “Declaration of Independence” by emphasizing Britain’s tyranny through strong diction and by citing specific examples of Britain’s oppressive ruling. Throughout the “Declaration of Independence”, …show more content…
In the opening paragraph, he describes the present King of Great Britain’s history as consisting of “repeated injuries and usurpations” that directly establish “absolute tyranny” over the states. The words “repeated injuries”, “usurpations” and “absolute tyranny” all have negative connotations which together allude Britain has continuously wounded the colonies and wrongfully encroached their rights. The oppressive connotation of these words are then enhanced by juxtaposing them with one’s rights of “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happens” to justify declaring independence from Britain’s totalitarian rule. Next, Jefferson references trespasses the King has committed against the colonies stating, “He has plundered…, ravaged…., burned…, and destroyed”. Each of these actions evoke emotions of fear among the colonists by threating their lives and livelihood. Additionally, these words are not only chosen due to their negative connotation, but also because Indians priory plagued the colonists in the same manner. As a result, Jefferson effectively justifies the Creation of the …show more content…
The first offense listed on the extensive list is, “He has refused his assent to laws, the most wholesome and necessary for the public good”; this means that the king has rejected laws that the colonial leaders needed to pass for the wellbeing of the colonists. Jefferson follows this fact with 11 others that justify the necessity of independence by illustrating how the king’s abusive authority represses representative government and creates an odious environment in the colonies. The next, 9 abuses such as “imposing taxes [in the colonies] without consent, point out that the king as well as the British parliament destroy the colonists’ right to self-rule. This specific citation of taxation without representation is significant because, it highlights the colonists’ unequal rights as British citizens and Britain’s disregard to treat them fairly. The king’s and parliament’s suppression of the colonists’ social, economic and political rights serves to validate the colonies decision to break away from their mother country and create states which uphold unalienable rights. The last five abuses refer to specific actions the king took to abandon the colonies such as “declaring [them] out of his protection and waging war against [them].” These examples of the king’s heartlessness mandates the formation of the Thirteen United

Related Documents