Confucian Influence On Chinese Society

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China is experiencing a remarkable religious renaissance that includes dark ages during Mao Zedong period, and revival and also reform in many traditional forms (Madsen 2011, p. 18). Religions not only in terms of organizations and conflicts, but also individual belief and convictions shaped the many of transformation of the history with continuous influence on society for the past few centuries (Dubois 2011, p. 1). Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism, Legalism have major impact in Asian society, particularly in China (Dubois 2011, p. 15). The teachings from those religions has made huge influence on people’s behaviors and belief furthermore building social and political development in China and such religious crisis also should be discussed in …show more content…
The official standard were also the life benchmark for citizens. In the ancient Chinese society, scholars studied the Confucianism for the official examination. Hence, Confucianism became stepping stone for ordinary people got into the dominating class. The Five Classics and the Confucian vision that two books were advocated by ancient Chinese Imperial Government. Confucianism for maintaining social harmony and stability have a positive effect whereas some people argue that Confucianism may restrain the Chinese people's thoughts as Chinese traditional society is a variety of unspoken rules that govern (Cao 2012, p. 2625; Dubois 2010, …show more content…
24; Madsen 2011, p. 21). Both of them with its own patriotic organization succeeded in friendly atmosphere with policy, opening society and the development of middle class (Dubois 2010, p. 349). Firstly, the main idea of Taoism is to advocate the harmony of the three qi, which are great positive, the great negative and harmony, and the ascendancy of emperors and kings, to achieve the Great peace (Madsen 2011, p. 21). As Chinese people serve Gods described as existing everywhere in all times as a ‘third eye’ that monitor human actions, there is a belief that one is being observed decreases the tendency of crime, immorality and antisocial actions (Cao 2012, p. 2622). In short, Chinese culture has been formed by historical reverence for social and personal harmony that reinforces the socially responsible behavior (Cao 2012, p. 2622). As comparison with Confucianism, Taoism less influences realm of political order however, contemporary reception can be made that it advocates political anarchism and laissez-faire to break the conventions of contemporary civilization in some ways because it could be understood as virtues of an individualist for human existence and challenging norms and authorities (Moller 2012, p.

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