Conformity Of Individuality In Aldous Huxley's Brave New World

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Our humanity predicates on the principle that individuals’ freedom and originality coexist adamantly with different human beings’ relations and uniqueness, yet we often ostracize human beings’ individuality. Similarly, we can adversely pinpoint how our society’s persistent conformity to one ideal of a human being relates to the Utopian society’s conformity of individuality presented in Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World. We divulge the inhumane isolation of humane emotions in the novel, yet we are conducting the very same principles to human beings who express their true individuality. Consequently, the aspects that define a humane individual appear in the novel’s character, John the Savage who represents the forgotten world of true humanity. …show more content…
Subsequently, his psychological traits promote destruction and violence within him that he is withheld to freely act as he wishes. His defense mechanism to refer to Shakespearean literature during periods of conflicts makes him associate sex pleasure as pain, suffering, and humiliation. Notably, it allows him to conform to his internal warfare between his peculiar emotions that no other human being experiences. It enables his rebellious emotions and actions towards the Utopian society that he profoundly begins to hate as the novel progresses. Likewise, his personality traits provides the foundation to put his ideals that Bernard also feels into practice rather than sulk over the possibilities and never enact them. Even his habit of being immensely moral provokes his distaste towards the Utopian society that he referred to as “brave new world” from adventurous and godlike to hatred for its obsession to use soma to enact feelings of happiness forever in its citizens. Consequently, John the Savage is the symbol of non-existent forms of true humanity that existed long ago before the Utopian society 's conformity plagued the world. He is the only human being that values literature, arts humane emotions, and humane emotions that enable him not to conform to society. Huxley 's intentionally uses him to predicate the humanistic beliefs in emotions, …show more content…
Consequently, he creates a range of psychological traits in his habits, defense mechanisms, and personality traits. His habits are immense morality that enables him to go against conformity, and constant reference to Shakespearean literature to understand his humanistic emotions. Additionally, his defense mechanisms range from rationalization to displacement to reaction formation those are vividly present in the novel. Notably, his personality traits are imaginative, independent, boldness, and sensitivity that provoke great optimism again the Utopian society. Furthermore, each of his psychological traits integrates great impact on himself and the novel that alienates him from seeking the luxury of acceptance in the world. His continuous reference to Shakespearean text induces many of his actions and thoughts on the Utopian society that he sees for the first time. Subsequently, his presence occurring in the novel fuels a spiral of events that greatly impact each of the other characters presented in the novel to succumb to. He is the symbol of humanistic values and emotions that prove quite tedious and frivolous to the Utopian world, but it also raises the Utopians great anger towards his conceptions on how to truly live life. Nevertheless, Huxley’s Brave New World exhibits in a Utopian society that contains compete dominance and manipulation

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