Theme Of Crisis In The Crucible

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It is often observed within both real life and within literature, that the moment when one learns the most about themselves is achieved through having to face a conflict either mentally or physically. At this point where one learns about them on a deeper level results in the individual undergoing a change in character. Within Arthur Miller’s Play, The Crucible, this idea of conflict sparking the change within a character is a constant underlying focus as the play’s theme depicts how individuals and society respond to times of crisis. It is a known fact that Arthur Miller wrote the play as an allegory for the alarming events such as The Red Scare and McCarthyism, which took place within the twentieth century. Thus the play demonstrates how …show more content…
When examining Arthur Miller’s The Crucible, on both a societal and an individual level, it is evident that crisis is a factor that greatly contributes to the character change within Abigail Williams, John Proctor and Reverend John Hale.

Within Arthur Miller’s The Crucible, how Abigail reacts to the initial crisis of the story causes havoc and madness throughout all of Salem. Within the first act of the text, it is revealed to the audience that Abigail, along with several other young girls, have been caught dancing in the woods. In 1692, in Salem, Maschettus dancing in the woods was considered witchcraft, thus when Abigail was caught committing this sin, she was struck with an enormous crisis. Should she face the consequences for her actions, as a mature young woman should? Or, should she pass the blame onto others in order to save face? This was a very difficult crisis to face, especially within a theocratic society such as Salem. A reputation is everything so to besmirch her name would be an absolute disaster, so instead she chooses to destroy other women’s reputations and good names. The crisis changes her
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Towards the start of the text, John is quite often described as a god-fearing man who is terrified to admit that he had committed a deadly sin. It is mentioned earlier within the text that John and Abigail had committed adultery with each other, thus meaning that John had committed the deadly sin of lust. John continually plays off the affair as if nothing had happened, especially to Elizabeth. Even when talking to Abigail he describes the affair as nothing and that they never touched. In addition to his refusal to admit that he is a sinner, he also continues to portray that he is a religious man to the common town folk even though he plows on Sundays. When questioned about his lack of attendance at church, he brushes it off and blames his attendance on the fact that Elizabeth is sick. At first when the crisis of the witch trials is starting to brew, John is told that he needs to admit to the affair in order to discredit Abigail’s testimony against all the accused witches. John immediately refused to besmirch his own name and to harm Abigail. However, as soon as Elizabeth Proctor is mentioned within the courts, John decides that will admit to the affair and he will throw Abigail in harms way in order to save others within the town such as his

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