Concussion Dilemma Essay

1214 Words 5 Pages
The Growing Concussion Dilemma Never did the parents of Freddy Mendoza, a young seventeen year-old football player from California, would die a couple days later after collapsing from a tackle that had previously “knocked him out of a 1991 game” the week prior (Carroll and Rosner 16). Concussions should not be taken lightly and are very serious because it affects the way the brain functions. Considering the amount of people who suffer from concussions each year, many do not know the definition, causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatments, effects, and preventions that contribute to the growing concussion crisis. A mild injury to the brain, known as a concussion, alters how your brain thinks and works. Concussions are caused when the brain crashes …show more content…
Signs and symptoms of a concussion may include: headache, temporary loss of consciousness, feeling foggy, dizziness, concentration and memory complaints, sensitivity to light and noise, vomiting, fatigue, sleep disturbances, and loss of balance (“Concussion”). There are other symptoms, but these are a few of the most common. Many believe that a person must be temporarily unconscious to be diagnosed with a concussion, but according to neurosurgeon Julian Bailes, “90 percent of the time athletes don’t get knocked out” (Parks 12). The diagnosis is depended on a neurological and physical examination and is also depends on the presence of symptoms. Besides an examination by a doctor, many computerized tests can aid in diagnosing (Tator). Really, there is no sort of tests that can prove a person has a concussion, but sometimes a CT scan or MRI can show the extent of the person’s injury (Parks 18). Usually these tests show up being “normal” (Tator). Concussions may be difficult to diagnose because they are based on an examination and the existences of …show more content…
Simply, wearing a seatbelt or helmet at all times reduces the risk of a head injury (Fallon 864). It is as easy as pie, still millions of people constantly forget to do this simple task. Enforcing and creating stricter rules for contact sports has hopefully kept athletes safer (Tator). According to Stefan Boehmer, “college football and all other leagues alike have created rules to hopefully keep players from using their helmet as a weapon rather that protection.” By making safer helmets, they do not necessarily prevent concussions because as stated by Dustin Fink, “there is no study available that any current product can prevent concussions” (Parks 71). Most importantly, “educating the public” about the consequences of concussions is a needed step (Tator). Millions of people do not know the seriousness of concussions nor do they know that they can kill people. Seventeen year-old, Bill Rideout, died in 1986 after “playing through a concussion” and was hit again leaving him unconsciousness (Carroll and Rosner 16). No one should ever push away concussion symptoms as it has ended many young athletic career lives. Knowing simple little precautions such as wearing a helmet when riding a bike or wearing a seatbelt when in the car can reduce the risks of a mild brain

Related Documents