Concept Of Tragedy In Things Fall Apart By Aristotle

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Aristotle was a famous disciple of Plato who first defines fine arts and he differs with his teacher Plato in his book of Poetic. His Poetic deals with the principles of Poetic art in general and tragedy. He defines Tragedy as “an imitation of an action that is serious, complete, and of a certain magnitude” (Aristotle, 2017). He also constituent parts of tragedy and they are plot, characters, thought, diction, song and spectacle. The first three plot, characters and thought are the object of imitation. The next two, diction and song are the medium of imitation. The last, spectacle is the manner of imitation. In particular on the basis of his analysis and the principles of his Poetic are Probability, Catharsis, Mimesis, Tragic Hero and Hamartia. This essay will explain tragedy looking through Aristotle’s tragic principles in the book Things fall Apart by Chinua Achebe. In Aristotle’s Poetic, he has mentioned the concept of Probability which simply explains the probability that a given character will react to a given situation is very high because of human nature. For instance in the book, Things fall Apart …show more content…
Aristotle’s idea on Tragedy and Aristotle says “Should have a flow or make some mistake. The hero need not need not die, but most undergo a change in fortune. The tragic hero may achieve some revelation fate, destiny, and the will of gods” (Aristotle, 1972). For example in Things fall Apart, Okonkwo’s greatest fault or hamartia is his pride. His own success as a self made man makes him impatient of others who are not successful. He fears that he will become like his father in the village and his pride leads to the abuse of his childrens and wives. Oknokwo is afraid of himself because he does not want to be weak. He has forgotten the duty that he owes himself. He also breaks the rule of community during peace week and yam festival by beating and shooting his

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