Theories Of Self Concept

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Self-concept is a general term used to refer to how we perceive, evaluate and think about ourselves. It is a mental picture of who we are as a person and how we see ourselves in relation to others and to our surroundings.
According to Carl Rogers (1959), self-concept has three different components:
• Self-image which is the view we have of ourselves
• Self-esteem or self-worth is how much value we place on ourselves and
• Ideal-self which is what we wish we are really like
If we have a positive self-concept, we tend to be more positive and feel good about who we are. If we have a negative or poor self-concept, we may feel unhappy with who we are. Self Esteem is how you feel about yourself. Image is about how you see yourself and how you believe
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How you see yourself is often different from how others view you. Your view of yourself is shaped by your unique thoughts and beliefs and you will have a distorted view. You will see yourself in a positive or negative way according to your level of self-esteem. You may have a negative view of yourself and if so you are probably highly critical of yourself.
In 1902 Charles Horton Colley presented the theory of looking glass self is a social psychological concept which is interested in how a biological person becomes a social person. He realizes that this involves the process of socialization. He states that infants have no conception of the world as being separate from themselves. This understanding is linked to the learning of language. According to the American sociologist Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929), the degree of personal insecurity you display in social situations is determined by what you believe other people think of you. people shape their self-concepts based on their understanding of how others perceive them. We form our self-image as the reflections of the response and evaluations of others in our environment. According to Cooley, this process has three steps. First, we imagine how we appear

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