Concept Of Evil In Religion

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The concept of evil from a religious perspective is addressed in religions and attributed to both an external force or internal depending on your religious beliefs. In some cases, whether one is using the broad or narrow concept of evil determines the source of the evil. Looking at a narrow concept of evil brings the most heinous crimes against humanity to the forefront and provides a stage in which to discover if evil is a problem for religion, how to respond, and look at the modern view of evil. Our world is about contradictions, extremes, and various outlooks so this should be no different. Discussing why evil should not exist, and then looking at both responding to and trying to prevent evil only serves to accentuate the problem of evil …show more content…
Irenaeus theodicy, focuses on the book of Genesis which reads “And God said, Let us make man in our image, after our likeness: and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.” (Genesis 1:26 KJV). As Dr. Davies-Stofka explains it, “God creates humans in a morally and spiritually imperfect state, so that they can choose, strive, and suffer. This is how we grow.” (Davies-Stofka, 2016). The first part of the verse from Genesis shows the creations in the image of God. That is to say; we are intelligent, conscious being with an understanding of morality. The image does not refer to a physical attribute here. The second part is the growth. We have the potential to grow throughout our lives into the likeness of God. This sounds reasonable if you initially buy into the thought process that God wants us to be like him, and that he wants us to want to be like him. This seems a little selfish on God’s part. The obvious question here, is why are we not created perfect? Beyond the selfish aspect, one response could be that to appreciate morality; one must develop it. If it is not developed, what would separate us from robots? Why is it important that we are not robots? The questions can, and do …show more content…
Since we are looking at the personal human side of evil, we must untimely remember we are dealing with humans on both sides of this equation. First, we have the victims. There are victims that are completely innocent of all wrong doing with the evil, some that are partially to blame, and there could be victims of evil that are also the cause. All of these people need a response. Comforting of victims and showing empathy is most appropriate. It may be easiest for to comfort the victim that is innocent, but also think of the others. The partially to blame victim is first and foremost still a human. With all of our flaws and lack of understanding, it is quite possible that the victim may not even understand they are part of the problem. With the second and third victim, modern science is showing us that it is not always correct to just blame someone for bad behavior or committing evil. Dr. James Fallon, a neuroscience expert, and professor at the University of California Irvine has made some incredible discoveries around a psychopath’s brain. With the availability of brain scans, a psychopathic killer can be identified with remarkable accuracy (Fallon, 2006). This is not an attempt to excuse such awful acts, but more to look at the human side to offer an explanation in the scientific

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