Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD)

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Borderline Personality Disorder also referred to as BPD is a mental disorder where the control and regulation of impulsions, relationship stability and outlook on both life and oneself are negatively affected (Lieb, Zanarini, Schmahl, Linehan & Bohus, 2004). This becomes a challenge for individuals affected by it especially in terms of the social context in everyday life. But it has become apparent that the roots of this illness are sometimes brought on quite early in human development, even if the symptoms do not show until later. Almost 80% of individuals with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) report a history of childhood abuse as a part of growing up in invalidating environments (Feigenbaum, 2007). Before clinicians can apply their …show more content…
Specifically, psychoanalysis helps reveal the earliest of times, in childhood where many individuals are often faced with conflicts and events as they act as a foundation for intellectual development later in life. Dialect Behaviour Therapy used to treat BPD also believes that it is important that patients past history is expressed because it acts as one of many steps of validation in treatment (Lynch, Chapman, Rosenthal, Kuo & Linehan, 2006). For this reason, Childhood invalidation or maltreatment including upbringing, past family history and sexual abuse in early life play a significant role in understanding the risk of developing …show more content…
The way families are tied together and the type of communication inside the household play a big role in the development of childhood ideals of belonging and relationships. In a previous study, psychologists analyzed the differences in invalidation reporting in two samples, one where individuals came from single-parent homes and the other from two-parent homes (Selby, Braithwaite, Joiner & Fincham, 2008). The analysis was based on a questionnaire participants were asked to rate things like affection and emotion using a Likert scale assessment method and the results indicated a Cronbach’s alpha of α = 0.86 hence a high internal consistency (Selby, Braithwaite, Joiner & Fincham, 2008; Institute for Digital Research and Education, 2015). This helps clarify the understanding that interaction with parents in childhood may lead to features of BPD and hence tie back to the idea of childhood invalidation as a precursor for the disorder. It is also important to look at the types of relationships parents have with their children. In many cases of BPD patients disclose information about relationships within their households, including divorce between parents. In an interview with one patient, one individual reported coming from a divorced family and reported a complicated relationship with the mother but indicated that her father blamed the child for his problems (Sneed, Balestri & Belfi, 2003).

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