Comparison Of Tragedy In The Great Gatsby And A Streetcar Named Desire

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Tragedy is an event causing great suffering, destruction, and distress. (The Definition of Tragedy). Both F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel, The Great Gatsby, and Tennessee Williams play, A Streetcar Named Desire, contain a character who undergoes a number of tragedies. In The Great Gatsby, main character Jay Gatsby is an extravagant, rich man who works hard for his fortunes and lives in a mansion located in West Egg. In A Streetcar Named Desire, Blanche Dubois comes from wealth and acts very prim and proper to deflect from the misfortunes her life entails. Jay Gatsby is the architect of his life, but Blanche Dubois is destroyed by the world in which she lives in. She is more sinned against than sinned. Jay Gatsby leads himself to his main tragedy …show more content…
Tom does not realize what Gatsby does to protect his wife, and only thinks about the negative characteristics he believes Gatsby has. Once he is made aware of the cause of death, Tom makes sure George Wilson is fully aware of his wife’s murderer. “He broke off defiantly. "What if I did tell him? That fellow had it coming to him. He threw dust into your eyes just like he did in Daisy 's, but he was a tough one. He ran over Myrtle like you 'd run over a dog and never even stopped his car."” (Fitzgerald, 190). Tom admits to telling George about Gatsby being the cause of his wife’s death which generates aggressive anger in George that he releases once he kills Gatsby. His death is the main tragedy within his life, that is easily avoided if he does not remove Daisy from the fault of Myrtle 's death. Gatsby indirectly arranges his death by willingly taking the blame for Daisy and allowing his love for her to cloud his mind and not think about the …show more content…
Gatsby makes his decisions fully aware the negative consequences, whereas Blanche is destroyed by factors around her that are out of her control. Jay Gatsby purposely moves across the bay from the love of his life, but also the person who creates his heartache. While being blurred by his love for Daisy, he makes the choice to protect her and take the blame for the killing of Myrtle, which indirectly leads to his own death. In contrast, Blanche Dubois undergoes a large amount of losses in her life that she does not deliberately cause, thus being Belle Reve, her job and Mitch. Following these traumatic experiences, Stanley Kowalski inflicts emotional and physical pain on her that brings her to ultimate destruction, that being another outside source of her tragedies. While Blanche is wishing to escape the traumatic experiences that occur one after another in her life, Jay Gatsby is arbitrarily constructing his

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