Comparison Of Those Winter Sundays And Digging By Robert Hayden

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Every family goes through different sorts of thick and thin in some point of life and only one thing that keeps it together is the bonding between family members. Young kids are the ones who are sensitive and more affected by the composition of the kind of different situations of their family. Although they might not have that ability to analyze, but they happen to intake it in their own instinct guidance. In the poem “Those Winter Sundays,” written by Robert Hayden and “Digging,” written by Seamus Heaney, both of them focus and prioritize the father role in their lives; however, it is the two speaker’s point of view, of what they were perceiving back then as a child is uncommon to each other. The speaker in the poem “Those Winter Sundays,” …show more content…
The speakers are grown-ups by the time when they are recalling their memories of what their father used to be like. In the case of “Those Winter Sundays,” the speaker talks about how laborious his father was that his hand would ache by the intense work of the weekdays, gets up early on Sundays cold mornings too. This should be the day of relaxing, but it won’t matter to him and keeps doing his chores as usual. On the other poem also, the speaker mentions about his father intense physical work of digging in a potato field. So, basically intense laborious work performed by the speakers’ fathers are the areas of both poems contending with each …show more content…
He does not mention anywhere about a personal attachment rather keeps praising about how tough and hard worker they were. Although most of the time, the speaker explains about every detail of digging process in a very articulate way by his father and grandfather, he acknowledges more in stanza 5 “By God the old man could handle the spade/Just like his old man” (15-16) and stanza 6 “My grandfather cut more turf in a day/ Than any other man on Toner’s bog” (17-18). He shows gratitude towards his ancestors for doing an intense work which he would never be able to do with such a pose. However, he indicates about not letting that legacy down by digging with the help of pen instead of the spade. He states his writing to be powerful “The squat pen rests; snug as a gun” (2), comparing with the guns and compelling to wrap up the readers thought to see pen as a strong tool. Indeed, he is able to spread his ancestor’s story to the

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