Comparison Of Jimmy Trump's 'Animal Farm' By George Orwell And Donald Trump

1294 Words 6 Pages
Both George Orwell’s allegorical tale, Animal Farm and Jimmy Fallon’s comedic clip of Donald Trump employ satire to demonstrate that some people are unfit to lead because they use fear and terror to maintain power. Orwell believes that any society where leaders have absolute power would fail because inevitably leaders use power for their own benefit. He criticises the failures of the Russian revolution and the subsequent totalitarian regime to provide strong and fair leadership and to establish equality. Orwell uses his simple farmyard fable to highlight the gaps between Bolshevik revolutionary ideals and practice as he mocks the totalitarian pretence that such societies can be regarded as equal. Jimmy Fallon’s piece of Horatian satire makes …show more content…
Fallon disarms this harsh and forbidding man by reducing him to a joke with caricature. Through a close up the audience can see the representation of Trump as a large, over-tanned man with a sweeping blonde toupee, which serves to highlight Fallon’s point that Trump is a figure who is excessive and should not be taken seriously. Further, this exaggeration of Trump is heightened when the bright lighting focused on the background reveals a portrait of Trump, symbolising arrogance and self-indulgence. These characteristics reveal the politician as not the type of man who is capable of fixing the flaws in the democratic nation. Both satirical pieces by Orwell and Fallon exhibit how power is used by leaders and once revealed as incompetent leaders then fear is used to maintain that …show more content…
Furthermore, ‘Animalism’ and the ‘seven commandments’ are created under the intention of equality, yet by the end of the book the commandments become the very thing that is unjust in ‘Animalism.’ It is only at the end of the tale that this is realised. The animals begin their revolution on the rules “Never to have any dealings with human beings, never to engage in trade, never to make use of money.” This is dramatic irony as the animals thought they remember these rules yet due to their illiteracy and the secret changes of the commandments it is only the reader and pigs who are left aware of the corruption. Orwell jests the nature of equality during Stalin 's reign which is embodied in the saying “All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others.” This paradox makes use of verbal irony, to point out the inconsistency in the animal’s social hierarchy. ‘Equal’ is an absolute term meaning one cannot be more equal than another as that beats the whole purpose of being equal. Also worth noting, the Pigs are never addressed as one of the animals except for pre-revolution era, after they ascend to power the farm is populated by the ‘pigs and the animals.’ This situational irony completely twist what audiences initially perceived equality to be on Animal Farm as the pigs are

Related Documents