Comparing The Moustache 'And' Jan's Story

Improved Essays
Kashmala Rehman
Losing a cherished one is sorrowful enough, but watching a loved one go away slowly is even more depressing. Alzheimer’s is a disease that can occur is middle to old age which causes people to lose their memory and other important mental functions. In the stories “The Moustache” and “Jan’s Story”, Mike and Barry go through a traumatic experience of losing a loved one because of the disease. They had to be a caregiver for the person who had lost their memory and as a result, they experienced changes in their own lives.
In “The Moustache”, a young boy named Mike grew a mustache because he wanted to look older, but little did he know, it came with a lot of responsibility. He went to visit his grandmother in the nursing home. Because of Alzheimer’s, Mike’s grandmother mistook
…show more content…
Barry explains in his words how he saw his love disappearing more and more everyday. In the story, it says, “...like saying goodbye by going to the same funeral over and over again”. His quote shows that it was really difficult for him to see his wife suffering. Even though Jan has Alzheimer’s, she lived life to fullest. Seeing his wife with Alzheimer’s affected Barry because it reminded him to enjoy every moment of life. In the conclusion of the story, “The Jan I knew is all but gone to me now, but I remember what she always taught me…to embrace life”. Alzheimer’s isn’t just a pain for the victim, but also for the person who’s related with the person who has the disease. In the stories “The Moustache” and “Jan’s Story”, Mike and Barry’s lives are affected because they dealt with a loved one who had Alzheimer’s. It’s a disease that is incurable and can happen to anyone, therefore, the caregivers have to be strong and supportive to the patient even though they are miserable from inside. I’ve never experienced losing someone or something that I really loved before, but I still get how terrible it must

Related Documents

  • Superior Essays

    Alzheimer's Poem Analysis

    • 1100 Words
    • 5 Pages

    What if you awoke one day with no recollection of your loved ones? That is the terrifying reality in Kelly Cherry’s “Alzheimer’s.” The poem details the experiences of an elderly man who suffers from the debilitating, and fatal disease, which plagues thousands. Once a lover of music and nature, his memory has begun to fade and deteriorate. In addition to his hobbies, his inability to recall his wife is yet another tragic outcome of his disease. The entirety of the poem takes place in the old man’s home, to which he has returned to after a trip at the hospital. Cherry utilizes tone, symbolism, as well as visual imagery to demonstrate “Alzheimer’s” theme of illness, and the feelings of loss and frustration it…

    • 1100 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Eulogy For Odysseus

    • 635 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Immediately after reading this section, I began to sympathize with the grandfather. His memory seems to be substantially impaired. Alzheimer's runs on my mother’s side of the family, so I know my fair share about memory loss and aging. My mom has had aunts who couldn't remember her face or name and watched as her grandparents’ memory deteriorated. Telemachos's grandfather's condition mirrors my kin's. The grandfather not only forgot Telemachos's name but confused him with his son. Also, the grandfather forgot what he was talking about almost immediately after speaking. Previous to this passage Telemachos mentioned how his grandfather will have good days and bad days. On the bad days, he'll neglect his hygiene and won't move. This could be a…

    • 635 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Living Old Summary

    • 397 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is neurodegenerative disease that affects patient's cognitive abilities (Tabloski, 2014). AD is the most common type of dementia, accounting for eighty percent of all dementia diagnosis (Tabloski, 2014). AD is irreversible, progressive, and there is no cure (Biercewicz, Filipska, & Kedziora-Kornatowska, 2016). The purpose of this post is to describe what I have learned after watching, the Frontline documentary, Living Old. I will discuss what I did not previously know, what I found surprising, and what piece of information I will take back to my nursing practice.…

    • 397 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Mrs Moor Dementia Summary

    • 969 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Although Mrs. Moor was able to talk about the past events, she could vaguely recall and describe the details of her stories. In addition, she could not remember her birthday, her age, and her medical conditions. She hadn’t lost touch with the presence yet; she seemed to be unaware about the fact that she repeated her stories multiple times during the interview. Thus, we suspected that Mrs. Moore might be in the early stage of Alzheimer’s disease.…

    • 969 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Alzheimer's Forgetting

    • 444 Words
    • 2 Pages

    3.) Family members and caretakers have to deal with the emotional toll that Alzheimer’s disease causes. Family members and caretakers have to deal with a lot of stress when it comes to Alzheimer’s. Family members and caretakers do their best when taking care of a person with Alzheimer’s and there is often guilt that…

    • 444 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Laura’s grandfather has begun having memory problems. First, he would constantly forget where he placed his keys or his wallet. Then he would have trouble remembering to pay the bills or cooking dinner. One day, Laura took him shopping, and in the middle of the trip, while they were both using the restroom, Laura’s grandpa left. Laura spent many hours searching for him in the shopping area, but to no avail, she could not find him. When she returned home, she found him sitting on the couch, and when she asked why he left her, he could not remember ever leaving the house for the shopping trip. As the days continued, the problems only accumulated, and communication became difficult as he failed to form words and coherent sentences. He could no longer…

    • 2193 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Someone with alzheimer’s is like a tree in Autumn, with all its leaves spread on the ground. Every leaf that has fallen is a fact or memory they used to remember, including knowing that particular fact, making it somewhat easier to cope with the reality of repeatedly losing their thoughts.…

    • 527 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    While aging, no one wants to be told that they have Alzheimer’s due to the difficulties and challenges that one must face. Unfortunately, Alzheimer’s disease is not only common among the elderly, but it is also a “major problem, its prevalence among older people should not be exaggerated” (Moody and Sasser 2015, 143). That is, “Alzheimer’s disease is irreversible and generally foreseeable in its course” (Moody and Sasser 2015, 143). Taking care of an Alzheimer’s patient includes training, medical knowledge, and time. For this reason, “taking care of persons with the disease living in their own homes usually becomes impossible. The result is often placement in a skilled nursing home, sometimes lasting many years” (Moody and Sasser 2015, 143). Hence, the stress of caregiving can affect one’s health. As a caregiver of an Alzheimer’s patient, on has to be sure to take care of one’s self “by getting regular medical care for yourself. If you need to be hospitalized or need time off from your caregiving duties, emergency respite care can be arranged. A caregiver whose health is seriously affected may need to look at alternative options for a loved one, such as a residential facility” (National Center for Chronic Disease…

    • 1146 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Alzheimer's Research Paper

    • 1104 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Alzheimer's disease is a frightening disease that is extremely difficult in the lives of those affected by it.…

    • 1104 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Alzheimer's Research Paper

    • 1494 Words
    • 6 Pages

    “Sometimes it is hard having a grandfather with Alzheimer’s. Since it is such a hard disease that cab advance quickly, when there is no way of knowing. In matter of fact, it is upsetting when he does not remember things, but luckily it has not gotten to the point where he does not remember who we are and I am thankful for that…

    • 1494 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    “We’re really a composite of our life experiences, memory layered upon memory, and Alzheimer’s steals that away.” Meryl Comer. This quote says it all. Imagine having dear memories ripped from the mind and how frustrating and confusing it must be to face each day. Alzheimer’s is one of the most misunderstood and severe diseases of the mind. Alzheimer’s is most known because of it is unpredictable effects it has on different people. It is overwhelming confusion in today’s medicine field leaves experts speculating and wondering what this condition is truly capable of in terms of destruction of the mind and body. This disease’s history, symptoms, and treatments all apart of what makes this disease so horrifying, wondrous, and confusing.…

    • 1009 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Alzheimer’s is a deadly disease which cannot be slowed, cured, or prevented. Alzheimer’s disease is a neurological disorder where memory loss and steady cognitive decline is caused by the death of brain cells. One in three seniors dies with Alzheimer’s or another dementia, which causes this disease to be the sixth leading cause of death in the United States according to the Alzheimer’s Association. People with Alzheimer’s and their caregivers should be informed of their diagnosis so can plan ahead and make good financial and medical decisions, so they can make use of their final days, and so they can take the opportunity to make amends with those they have wronged.…

    • 558 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The process of the disease is painted in a far more gruesome light than most people anticipate. I did not realize to what extent that the disease just keeps taking away. People normally do not take into consideration how the family reacts. In Still Alice, the audience sees a strong husband slowly chip away, a frequently verbally assaulted and invaded daughter that is trying her best to assist, and two other children who help when they are around but distance themselves from the afflicted. When you think of Alzheimer’s disease, you really only consider the patient and their main care giver, but the audience now has a greater understanding of the bigger…

    • 2049 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Meryl Comer, lost a loved one to Alzheimer’s, points out “we’re really a composite of our life experiences – memory layered upon memory and Alzheimer’s steals that away.” Memories are what most people are made up of, but the people who have Alzheimer’s disease no longer remember what memories are. Instead, they see faces and are surrounded by unfamiliar people and places. When signs of Alzheimer’s begin to appear in a beloved family member the person wishes there was a cure because that person knows their loved one will pass away with no chance of survival. Alzheimer’s is the most common form of dementia. The word dementia describes a set of symptoms that can include memory loss and difficulties with thinking, problem-solving or language. Alzheimer’s…

    • 240 Words
    • 1 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Alzheimer's Influences

    • 926 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Similar to any other disease, Alzheimer’s has aspects that are unique to the individual. While there are common symptoms that everyone will experience there are certain ones that are unique to certain individuals. There are many aspects in a dementia patient’s life that is affected. They are affected psychologically, emotionally, culturally, spiritually, and socially. While working with the family of a person who is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s and the individual you need to be aware of what aspects in their life are important.…

    • 926 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays