Comparing Kamakura And Muromachi Eras

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Artistic evolution occurs throughout the Kamakura and Muromachi eras, altogether spanning from 1185 to 1550. Developing areas of art include literature, theatre, and visual arts. Both eras demonstrate interests regarding the past, Buddhist principles, and tradition but have different influences. Kamakura era literature discusses loyalism and Buddhist concepts. The era begins as war between the Taira and the Minamoto families concludes in 1185. The Tale of the Heike, a significant war recollection, reflects developing value towards documenting and reflecting on the past, as well as ongoing nationalism (Varley, 91). It continues acting as a documentation guideline (Varley, 108). Kamakura era Buddhism brings new medieval aesthetics and continues …show more content…
This sinification occurs through Buddhist Zen temples, art trade, tea ceremonies or chanoyu, and theatre (Varley, 113; 121; 124). Tea master Murata Shūko expresses a common perspective about Chinese influence, caring to "harmonize Japanese and Chinese tastes" (qtd. 129). Zen temples bring the landscape garden practice, valuing impermanence and wabi (rustic, withering) aesthetic (Varley, 134; 129). Chanoyus begin as informal and evolve into articulate practices, influencing the status quo that Chinese imported art holds in chashitsu (tea rooms) to designing chashitsu (Varley, 126). Chanoyus have hosts touting imported art collections, the highest value on Chinese art (126). Daimyo Sasaki Dōyō is known for expressing pride over his collection during his chanoyus (125-126). Growing chashitsu design significance portrays the shift towards traditional aesthetic in developing shown rooms that are simple and asymmetrical …show more content…
Nōh plays are dramas that signify movement through bugaku dance with gagaku music (113). Theater music includes sarugaku (monkey), which implies acrobatic form, and dengaku (field), which implies peasant culture (114). Both rival each other but have enough mutual influence to be similar (114). Two main figures in Nōh, Kan'ami and his son Zeami, perfect the art form to earthly aesthetic and define yūgen with equivalence to courtliness (Varley, 114; 116). Other components of theater include imitation, war-based nationalism, and some comedy through kyōgen style (115; 116). Imitation and yūgen is prevalent in Nōh acting, War-based nationalism appears in many warrior plays, and Kyōgen plays have miscellaneous subjects (115; 116) Kyōgen plays vary from Nōh play introductions to random comedies

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