Comparing Franklin's Autobiography 'And Frederick Douglass' Narrative

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There is much to learn from both Benjamin Franklin’s autobiography and Frederick Douglass’ narrative. Both Franklin and Douglass’ writings include historical events. These men’s stories let us into not only their background but also a peek into their minds. Both stories tell of diligence when reading/writing. I felt I could easily relate to both stories because we all start somewhere and even when little obstacles get in the way you just have to keep trying. Frederick Douglass taught us not to let people bring you down even if they swear you can’t succeed in something. Benjamin Franklin taught us to learn from your mistakes and grow from them don’t let them discourage you.
Benjamin Franklin taught us a lot about himself and his overall life in his autobiography. It’s obvious Franklin is very intelligent, but reading his autobiography I learned why he is so intelligent; due to
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Something that also stuck out to me was that Ben Franklin was very self-sufficient. He would notice the error in his ways and learn from that error to keep improving. An example of this was quitting his brother’s job. I learned from this not to ponder on the mistakes you make or errors you make but to take them and grow. Frederick Douglass’ narrative I feel was a very personal journey. He went into detail about the events he witnessed and the punishments he felt himself. Frederick’s narrative taught us slaves were people too and had just as much potential as the next person, and I feel that’s a lesson he really tried to emphasize. Frederick Douglass was also diligent in learning and very intelligent despite his upbringings. One lesson I really learned from this narrative was that you cannot change where

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