Comparing and Contrasting Social Issues and Formalities of Henry James’s “Daisy Miller” and Edith Wharton’s “The Other Two”

1104 Words Feb 8th, 2014 5 Pages
Comparing and Contrasting Social Issues and Formalities of Henry James’s “Daisy Miller” and Edith Wharton’s “The Other Two”
In Henry James’s “Daisy Miller” and Edith Wharton’s “The Other Two,” the narrators each disclose the complications of their party’s social formalities during circumstances within their own society. In both short stories, Winterbourne and Waythorn try to figure out their adored ones character and motives but for different reasons. In “Daisy Miller,” it’s noticeable that Mr. Winterbourne ends up longing for Daisy Miller as he tries to fully categorize the character she’s carelessly ruining. While in “The Other Two,” the narrator examines a society of how a married couple, Waythorn and Alice, adjust to an awkward
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In “Daisy Miller,” one can anticipate where Daisy’s falling reputation and Winterbourne teasing companionship with her will lead during their stay in Rome. While Alice and Waythorn companionship is real since they recently been married, they must to learn how to deal with Alice’s two ex-husbands. Daisy and Alice are both from New York and both have dealt with men before. Although Daisy hasn’t been married and dealt with men in marriage like Alice, Daisy is perceived to be a big flirt and interacts with many guys. Americans are perceived to be flirtatious in “Daisy Miller”, but Alice does not seem to have those qualities, at least not since she’s been married. Although Alice and Daisy both try to be friendly with others in their society, Alice tries her best to be “less awkward” when in presence of her former spouses but Daisy is friendly but seems to not care what her present society thinks of her improper behavior. For Example, at one point Mrs. Walker tells Winterbourne, “Everything that is not done here. Flirting with any man she could pick up; sitting in corners with mysterious Italians; dancing all the evening with the same partners; receiving visits at eleven o’ clock at night. Her mother goes away when visitors come.” (James 529). Daisy knows everyone that notices her behavior will feel awkward but she is mostly in a quirky free-spirit with a sense of pride as if social

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