Compare Public Management Reform in the Uk with Singapore. What Does the Comparison Tell You About the Factors That Shape Public Management in Each Country?

3967 Words Feb 12th, 2012 16 Pages
Competency, bureaucracy and public management reform: A comparative analysis
Make sure I read before completing essay, very relevant!
Also last seminar presentation (governance, NPM)

Compare Public Management Reform in the UK with Singapore. What does the comparison tell you about the factors that shape public management in each country?
Introduction
Governments around the world are moving from outmoded tradition towards managerial modernity in attempt to get their public sector organisations to run better. A key issue on a countries public agenda in society is education to ensure sufficient knowledge is attained for their citizens, more specifically, the next generation. The emphasis on education is evident because it provides
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The UK became neo-liberal like Singapore where Thatcherism conveyed much of her thinking. She wanted to increase productivity, privatisation, and cut welfare to make labour markets more competitive where it would establish a more flexible and competitive working practice and culture. Therefore, the educational policies were driven by a set of assumption about choice, markets, standards, accountability and relationship between competitiveness, economic growth and the education system.

Singapore mirrored their colonial predecessor’s political system, where both parliamentary regimes are based on bureaucratic principles organised along Westminster lines. Both are highly centralised where the prime ministers cabinet is responsible for enforcing collective responsibility among ministers and endorsing new policies, even though they are developed outside the cabinet in the relevant department and committees, i.e. ministry of education for the UK and Singapore. For both systems, the executive is powerful where the legislature doesn’t counterbalance in terms of power, like other countries with a presidential- congress regime i.e. the UK. As a result, government can process its legislation through easier.
Analysing the reforms
1976 was a turning point for education, when James Callaghan questioned whether the compulsory education system was providing government and society with what was needed; there was also concern that education wasn’t meeting the needs of

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