Compare And Contrast The Women's Movement And The Abolitionists

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With the civil war approaching, various group sought to perfect and reform society, each with different goals and backgrounds. By creating this reform, groups hoped to expand their liberty and freedoms they enjoyed in this time period. Through this goal of cleansing, certain groups; such as, the women’s movement and the abolitionist’s movement, built each other up in order to benefit them both. The women’s movement and the abolitionist’s movement were intertwined in the way that many woman who would go on to be leaders in the women’s right movement got their political start in the abolitionist movement. Through demanding the freedom of slaves due to the way they were being treated, women began to realize their own injustices. The 1848 Seneca Falls convention was one of the key early movements in the United States. The convention brought together over 300 people, advocating …show more content…
The connections they made, their experience gained, and the sense of empowerment they gained by taking political action allowed them to fight for abolition for African Americans, as well as for the equal treatment of women in society. The act of women fighting for suffrage would lead to the feminist movements that took place. Some of the themes of these movements were self-realization that they were being treated unfairly, the realization that they wanted to participate in the market revolution, which was he expansion of the market place in the early 19th century, and the use of the slavery of sex analogy, which compared slavery to a woman that is married and not treated as an equal. The document, Margaret Fuller's "Woman in the Nineteenth Century" (1845), outlines some of these as Margaret Fuller explained that American women were not enjoying the blessings of American freedom. They were being denied the vote, legally subordinate to their husbands, and lacking basic legal

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