Comparing John Minto's The Shoe-Horn Sonata And The Send Off

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Individuals introduced to new and challenging environments often adapt themselves and their relationships to ensure their survival. Arising one to being capable to make the decision to sacrifice their possessions for another's gain, however this results to the hinder of accepting the truth. John Minto's "The Shoe-Horn Sonata", demonstrates how the close bond between individuals, influences their decisions to assist another for the better good, while one must suffer. Similarly, Wilfred Owen's "The Send Off" are able to portrays the connection between an individual to their society, impacting their motivation to protect despite the aftermath. Thus, both themes and characters within the texts are form by distinctly visual elements.

In both John Minto's "The Shoe-Horn Sonata" and Wilfred Owen's "The Send Off", in characters are introduced to a perception of support through the
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The motif of looking at the soldiers, suggest the insignificant connection that the towns people have as they do not speak a word to the soldiers. Further suggesting the truth about war, is being hidden away by the people. Thus, this shows the negative reaction the soldiers receive, despite their participation in conflict. Causing them to creep back, silent, to still village wells, metaphorically depicts their loss in war, as they arrive without a celebration like their departure. Referring to the oxymoronic position the soldiers are placed in as they have loss a possession during their time in war, while the towns people gain as they were protected from the dispute. Therefore, individuals in great need in assistances often would sacrifice their belongings to be able to gain their needs, however this results to negatively affect other

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