Compare And Contrast The Pardoner And The Knight's Tale

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Throughout the journey to Canterbury, two tales were read. Each held very few similarities to the other, but each possessed quite a few differences. These two tales were expressed by men from two incomparably different walks of life. One was a well-born knight who found victory in battle, placed others before him, and took great pride in his two most extraordinary horses. The other story teller was a pardoner, who did not believe most of his own teachings, hornswoggled people for their money, and knew just how many non-vernacular Latin words he had to use to assure the common people of his sincerity. Both the Knight and the Pardoner told quite thought-provoking tales, but the Knight expressed his story in a more successful manner. The Knight’s story captivated its readers by attaching them to its characters, making every failure, emotion, and success affect the reader personally, and by the end of the tale the reader was able to take away a lesson they would never forget. “The Knight's tale” was a story of two brothers-in-arms. The knights in …show more content…
Both tales used human experiences to demonstrate how human emotion and intervention can cause large scale problems with irreversible consequences. However, “The Knight’s Tale” more effectively captured the reader’s attention through its character development and emotion, which allowed its moral lesson to be comprehended more effectively. Unlike, “The Pardoner’s Tale” which was kept short and emotionally detached, “The Knight’s Tale” was also able to add more detail to the tale making it much more entertaining for those reading the story. “The Knight's Tale” was able to captivate its readers through the character’s success and failures, making the reader feel every emotion the character felt, so contrary to “The Pardoner’s Tale”, its moral lesson was not able to be

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